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UK Research and Innovations (2018)

Connect4 water resilience : connecting water resources, communities, drought and flood hazards, and governance across 4 countries in the Limpopo basin

Water Drought Flood Limpopo

Titre : Connect4 water resilience : connecting water resources, communities, drought and flood hazards, and governance across 4 countries in the Limpopo basin

Pays/Région : Southern Africa (Botswana, South Africa, Zimbabwe and Mozambique)

Durée : nov. 18 - mai 22

Référence projet : NE/S005943/1
Catégorie : Research Grant

Résumé partiel
The ’CONNECT4 water resilience’ project brings together a multidisciplinary team of hydrologists and sociologists from academia, policy and practice in the UK, Botswana, South Africa, Zimbabwe and Mozambique to investigate the physical and societal factors affecting vulnerability and resilience to drought and floods in 4 countries of the Limpopo River Basin (LRB). The research will provide a better understanding of the connectivity within and between physical and social aspects of vulnerability to improve societal preparedness and resilience to flood and drought hazards in arid Sub-Saharan regions.

The LRB is an arid, water-stressed basin, yet with high susceptibility to floods. It encompasses a large diversity of physical and socio-economical characteristics spread across four countries (Botswana, South Africa, Zimbabwe and Mozambique). Floods and droughts have been shown to exacerbate water availability and quality problems and are predicted to increase in frequency and magnitude.

We will focus on the challenges and opportunities during floods following droughts in the LRB, when aquifers and communities are already under stress, and when appropriate flood management could improve short term coping mechanisms and long-term resilience for future dry seasons. We will explore to what extent geographical differences between sub-regions influence how water resources respond to, and how people cope with floods and droughts in order to inform appropriate water management strategies at various scales (local to transnational).

Lead Research Organistion : University of Aberdeen

Financement : Natural Environment Research Council (NERC)
Budget  : £265 487

UK Research and Innovations

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