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UK Research and Innovations (2019)

The role of heartwater (Ehrlichia ruminantium infection) and other tick-borne pathogens in Acute Camel Death Syndrome in Kenya

Heartwater Camel Kenya

Titre : The role of heartwater (Ehrlichia ruminantium infection) and other tick-borne pathogens in Acute Camel Death Syndrome in Kenya

Pays/Région : Kenya

Durée : janv. 19 - oct. 20

Référence projet : BB/S004890/1
Catégorie : Research Grant

Résumé partiel
Dromedary camels are important food-producing animals in northern Kenya and vital for the economy, food security and well-being of pastoralist communities. Their population is steadily increasing year-on-year and stood at over 3.2 million in 2016. The Kenyan camel meat and milk industry is worth approximately US$11 million annually. Acute Camel Death Syndrome (ACDS) is an emerging disease of unknown cause affecting camel herds in parts of northern Kenya. Up to 100% of affected adult camels can die without treatment. Unlike other camel diseases that are well-recognised by local pastoralists, ACDS is a new disease for which Kenyan camel keepers have no vernacular name. Clinical and post-mortem signs show strong similarities to heartwater, a tick-borne disease of sheep, goats and cattle that is endemic throughout sub-Saharan Africa, but has only been described in camels in other parts of Africa on three occasions in the past 60 years. Affected camel herds may be heavily infested with ticks, and the causative agent of heartwater, the intracellular bacterium Ehrlichia ruminantium, has been detected in ticks removed from camels affected by ACDS. However this does not prove that ACDS is a manifestation of heartwater in camels ; other tick-borne pathogens (TBP) may be involved in the syndrome.

Lead Research Organisation : University of Liverpool

Financement : Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC)
Budget  : £100 796

UK Research and Innovations

Page publiée le 5 septembre 2022