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UK Research and Innovations (2020)

An inter-disciplinary approach to understanding the contribution of household flooring to disease burden in rural Kenya

Household Flooring Disease Kenya

Titre : An inter-disciplinary approach to understanding the contribution of household flooring to disease burden in rural Kenya

Pays/Région : Kenya

Durée : sept. 20 - sept. 23

Référence projet : MR/T029811/1
Catégorie : Research Grant

Résumé partiel
Access to adequate, safe and affordable housing plays a fundamental role in human health. This includes thorough limits our exposure to infectious diseases such as those that cause diarrhoea, which remains a leading cause of death in children under five. Conventional approaches to reducing environmental exposure to faecal pathogens include ensuring universal access to safe water and basic sanitation. Recent evidence has suggested that this alone may be insufficient to reduce the high levels of environmental contamination seen in poor rural communities, and that transformative cross-sectoral approaches will be required to see real impacts in child health. For example, these approaches fail to address the fact that most poor rural homes have rudimentary (earth, sand or dirt) floors that are difficult to sanitise, providing an ideal environment for the survival of faecal pathogens and other parasites. These floors can also host parasitic infections including intestinal nematodes and sand fleas, both of which are responsible for considerable morbidity and poor quality of life.

We propose to examine flooring and its impact on enteric and parasitic diseases in three culturally and environmentally diverse settings in Kenya, and aim to address two related questions : 1. What is the importance of household flooring as a driver of enteric and parasitic infection risk in rural communities, and does this vary across wider social and environmental contexts ? 2. Can infection risk be mitigated by replacing existing rudimentary (earth, sand or dirt) floors with improved (sealed, washable and durable) materials, and what additional behaviour changes are required to ensure impact ?

Lead Research Organisation : London Sch of Hygiene and Trop Medicine

Financement : MRC
Budget  : £2 011 328

UK Research and Innovations

Page publiée le 4 septembre 2022