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2021

Responding to the challenge of MERS-CoV : Development and testing of interventions to reduce risk among Bedouin populations in Southern Jordan

Jordanie

Department for International Development UKAID

Titre : Responding to the challenge of MERS-CoV : Development and testing of interventions to reduce risk among Bedouin populations in Southern Jordan

Pays : Jordanie

Numéro du projet : GB-GOV-13-FUND—GCRF-MR_T02996X_1

Organismes de mise en œuvre : Royal Veterinary College

Durée : Actual Start 01 Jan 2021 // Planned End31 Mar 2023

Objectifs partiels
Building on a successful GCRF Foundation Award, our overall aims in this project are to : 1. Address, through state-of-the-art interdisciplinary research in Jordan, critical knowledge gaps urgently required to inform future effective vaccination strategies for Middle Eastern Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV), identified through the GCRF Foundation Award. In particular i) who (or which, in the case of camels) should be targeted for vaccination, ii) the correct seasonality for deployment of vaccines and iii) the sociocultural issues, including vaccine acceptability, that are likely to be faced. 2. Engage, develop and implement appropriate community-informed, contextualized behavioural public health interventions to mitigate risk among rural communities at high risk of MERS-CoV infection. 3. Further build capacity for strategic research, surveillance and control activities targeted at MERS-CoV. To achieve these three overall aims, our specific objectives are : 1. Provide epidemiological evidence on the risks and drivers of MersCoV in community dwelling populations in contact with camel herds. We will : (i) estimate the incidence rates of infection among high-risk individuals (camel workers / shepherds), (ii) assess and estimate secondary attack rates in household members with no direct camel contact, (iii) assess likely transmission pathways, (iv) determine whether natural infection is protective. 2. Assess prevalence of and potential impact of co-morbidities such as diabetes and smoking related illnesses on risk of MERS-CoV infection. Co-morbidities will be considered in this study as those associated with the probability of infection being symptomatic, representing potential clinical risk groups to be offered future vaccines. 3. Identify viral shedding patterns and immunological responses to infection in camels in terms of : (i) patterns of viral shedding by age and season, (ii) role of prior infection on viral shedding. 4. Develop an in-depth understanding of the social, cultural and religious factors that shape perceptions of MERS-CoV (and camel zoonoses in general) and attitudes towards control measures, particularly the deployment of potential future vaccines among these communities. Specifically, we will investigate : i) the role of camels in Bedouin identity and the social imaginary, ii) social, cultural and religious influences on risk-related behaviours, iii) the roles and perspectives of other household members including women in relation to zoonotic disease risks and household hygiene practices, iv) the likely influences of the above factors on acceptability and uptake of risk-reduction interventions, including vaccination

Financement : UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
Project budget : £1,964,234

Présentation (UKAID)

Page publiée le 16 octobre 2022