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Accueil du site → Projets de développement → Projets 2017 → Improving food safety by reducing pesticide residues : developing a pheromone alternative to insecticides for control of thrips on legumes in Kenya

2017

Improving food safety by reducing pesticide residues : developing a pheromone alternative to insecticides for control of thrips on legumes in Kenya

Kenya

Department for International Development UKAID

Titre : Improving food safety by reducing pesticide residues : developing a pheromone alternative to insecticides for control of thrips on legumes in Kenya

Pays : Kenya

Numéro du projet : GB-GOV-13-FUND—GCRF-BB_P022391_1

Organismes de mise en œuvre : Keele University

Durée : Actual Start 01 Jun 2017 // Actual End30 Nov 2019

Objectifs
Crops for domestic consumption in Kenya frequently contain unacceptably high levels of pesticide residues because many smallholder farmers misuse and overuse chemical insecticides while struggling to control insect pests. The current crop management systems of many smallholder farmers need to change. Cowpea is widely grown in Kenya and the rest of sub-Saharan Africa and is a staple food that is important in subsistence farming. The bean flower thrips is a major pest of cowpea and other legumes, causing crop losses of 20-80%. It is difficult to control because it has resistance to insecticides and this leads to frequent insecticide overuse. Alternative control methods for thrips on cowpea are therefore a priority for improving food safety. The development of effective alternative control methods will reduce insecticide use and so make food safer by reducing levels of pesticide residues. Alternative methods will also increase crop yields, improve safety for farm workers and reduce environmental impact. The aim of this proposal is to develop alternative control methods for the bean flower thrips on cowpea and other legumes in Kenya, using aggregation pheromone, which can be used cheaply and safely by smallholder farmers. Our ability to do this is currently limited by gaps in our knowledge of thrips aggregation pheromones and how they work. Objective 1. To synthesise the pheromone components previously identified from adult male bean flower thrips (Megalurothrips sjostedti). Objective 2. To determine the effects of the pheromone components on the mating behaviour of the bean flower thrips. Objective 3. To test the pheromone components in the field for their effects on trap catches and aggregation, and test their efficacy for control of the bean flower thrips by (a) mass trapping, (b) mating disruption and (c) spot treatment away from the crop. Objective 4. To test the efficacy of the pheromone components in ""lure and infect"" autoinoculation devices with spores of the fungus Metarhizium anisopliae (strain ICIPE 69) for control of the bean flower thrips. Objective 1 is laboratory-based at Keele and is essential to allow progress on Objectives 2-4. Objective 2 is laboratory-based in Kenya and Objectives 3 and 4 are field-based in Kenya.

Financement : UK - Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
Project budget : £462,504

Présentation (UKAID)

Page publiée le 13 octobre 2022