Informations et ressources scientifiques
sur le développement des zones arides et semi-arides

Accueil du site → Master → Etats Unis → 2022 → Consumer Study of Agrivoltaics Food Products Including Tomato, Basil, Potato, Bean, and Squash

University of Arizona (2022)

Consumer Study of Agrivoltaics Food Products Including Tomato, Basil, Potato, Bean, and Squash

Rogers, Mariah Autumn

Titre : Consumer Study of Agrivoltaics Food Products Including Tomato, Basil, Potato, Bean, and Squash

Auteur : Rogers, Mariah Autumn

Université de soutenance : University of Arizona

Grade : Master of Science (MS) 2022

Résumé
The focus of agrivoltaic systems (AVS) research has been on microclimatic impacts and the associated agricultural production. More recently, AVS research has begun to focus on social acceptability regarding the solar industry and solar implementation, but few studies have assessed the effects of the AVS microclimate on the sensory and consumer acceptability of crops. We used the lens of the three pillars of sustainability (economic, social, environmental) to assess the broader sustainability of AVS. More specifically, to understand how AVS products will be viewed in the market, we studied five species of produce (Solanum lycopersicum (‘Perfect Cocktail Snack’ cherry tomatoes), Ocimum basilicum (‘Sweet’ basil), Solanum tuberosum (‘Caribe’ potatoes), Phaseolus vulgaris (‘Anasazi’ red beans), and Cucurbita moschata (butternut squash)) grown under solar panels and grown in traditional, full-sun (control) conditions. AVS and control grown crops were compared using untrained panelists recruited at both the University of Arizona Main Campus and Biosphere 2. Participants were asked to distinguish any perceptible differences between AVS and open field conditions and if there were preferences in taste between AVS and open field conditions. Binomial logistic regressions were used to assess the maximum likelihood estimation to evaluate the probability of future consumers’ ability to discriminate between AVS and control conditions. Multinomial logistic regressions were used to determine the maximum likelihood estimation to evaluate future consumers’ preferences and willingness to pay for AVS and control grown products. The sensory evaluation results revealed that there were significant differences between growth conditions (p<0.05) for tomatoes, beans, and squash samples (Table 3), however, there was only a significant difference in preference (p<0.05) for bean samples (Figures 2 - 4). Participants were also willing to pay the same or more for their favorite samples after they were told that their favorite samples were grown under solar panels (Figure 5). With this information, stakeholders can understand that preference and differences between growth conditions were not perceived by tasters. As a result, this thesis can be used to determine potential outcomes of AVS products in the marketplace and fills a major gap regarding sensorial perceptions and social acceptance of AVS grown crops.

Mots clés : Agrivoltaics Consumer Study Flavor Sensory Social Acceptability Solar Panels

Présentation

Version intégrale (1,7 Mb)

Page publiée le 19 novembre 2022