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Van Hall Larenstein University of Applied Sciences (2009)

The spillover of good crop protection practices for export crops to crops for the domestic market : a case of Kirinyagah district, Kenya

NGUNA MAUNDU JANET

Titre : The spillover of good crop protection practices for export crops to crops for the domestic market : a case of Kirinyagah district, Kenya

Auteur : NGUNA MAUNDU JANET

Université de soutenance : Van Hall Larenstein University of Applied Sciences

Grade : Master of Management of development Specialisation International Agriculture 2009

Résumé
This research carried out in July 2009 looks at the crop protection practices by smallholder vegetable growers which are in the export market production and are used in the crops destined for the domestic market in Kirinyagah district. In recent years more and more attention has been given to food safety. Most of the French beans produced in Kenya are exported to the European market where the European Union regulations and requirements of food safety are stringent such as the Globalgap. In contrast, for tomatoes produced for the domestic market it is not known whether farmers comply with the set regulations except for a few of the market outlets such as Nakumatt supermarket where producers are known to comply with the KENYAGAP which is a local standard benchmarked against the International standard of Globalgap.

It would be interesting to see whether there is a gap between the export production of French beans and the production of tomatoes destined for the domestic market in terms of compliance of the pesticide use regulations. It would also be interesting to find out why farmers use good crop protection practices for an export crop such as French beans and not apply the same practices on a crop destined for the domestic market such as tomato.

The study revealed that there were more crop protection practices carried out by the Globalgap certified farmers as compared to those applied by the non Globalgap certified farmers. Their exists very stringent standards in pesticide use for export French beans such as use of approved and less toxic pesticide which was noted that some of the chemical pesticides used in French beans are also used in tomato production which shows that farmers are complying with pesticide regulations for both markets. Other pesticides used for tomatoes were compared with the recommended list and they were found to be complying. The study focused on aspects of farmers health where farmers are using protective clothing, secondly on consumer health where farmers are observing preharvest interval and thirdly environmental health where farmers are ensuring proper disposal by using disposal pits. However, there exist differences in the production of export French beans and the tomatoes destined for the domestic market such as the production period for French beans is shorter (approximately 45 days) whereas for tomatoes is longer (approximately 120 days) this implies that demand for synthetic chemical pesticides is higher in tomatoes as compared to French bean . Despite the length of the production period, the question is, are farmers applying chemical pesticide in the right quantities and correct timing ? There have been reports in recent studies showing that there are high levels of pesticide residue in horticultural vegetables produce sampled from the market in Kenya

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