Informations et ressources scientifiques
sur le développement des zones arides et semi-arides

Accueil du site → Master → Pays Bas → 2010 → Contribution of cassava and sweet potato production to the livelihood of smallholder farmers in HIV/AIDS context : the case of Zvishavane district, Zimbabwe

Van Hall Larenstein University of Applied Sciences (2010)

Contribution of cassava and sweet potato production to the livelihood of smallholder farmers in HIV/AIDS context : the case of Zvishavane district, Zimbabwe

Manyumwa Dadirayi

Titre : Contribution of cassava and sweet potato production to the livelihood of smallholder farmers in HIV/AIDS context : the case of Zvishavane district, Zimbabwe

Auteur : Manyumwa Dadirayi

Université de soutenance : Van Hall Larenstein University of Applied Sciences

Grade : Master of Management of Development specialization Rural Development and HIV/AIDS 2010

Résumé partiel
The research problem that formed the basis of this study was Africare’s lack of information on the contribution of cassava and sweet potato production to reduce the households’ vulnerability to the impact of AIDS. Cassava and sweet potato were introduced for in the wards that had highest HIV prevalence in Zvishavane district which is also a drought prone area. The wards were rated to have high levels of food insecurity at the time of introduction. The purpose of the study was to explore how the contribution of cassava and sweet potato to household food security and income affected the livelihood assets of HIV/AIDS affected households. The introduction of cassava and sweet potato under the Midlands Food Security and HIV project for was both a drought and AIDS impact mitigation strategy considering that the crops are labour extensive, drought tolerant and have low requirement of external inputs like inorganic fertiliser.

The study had a qualitative approach based on empirical data and literature. The data collection involved interviews with 16 smallholder farmers in four categories : three HIV/AIDS affected and one non-affected. The HIV/AIDS affected were households that had chronically ill persons, experienced death from HIV/AIDS related illness or caring for orphans. It was expected that the different categories would reveal differential impact of AIDS on the households.

Data was collected by use of combination of methods which included mapping (PRA tool adapted), direct interviews, direct observations and Africare project reports. The use of mapping to collect data for area under cultivation and crops grown by the household was found to be quite useful. It was interesting to note that the households could not quickly provide information about the size of their farms and area under cultivation. Using the map estimations of the area under individual crops was added up to give the total farm area under cultivation. It provided information on land the households have access to and how it is used as a livelihood capital. From the crops grown, the households provided further information on the time frame the crop would suffice household needs and also provided information on crop sells. It led to the drawing up a food availability calendar which provided information on food gaps and farmers explained their coping strategies. The key informants were extension workers and root and tuber association representative whose interviews yielded information on cassava and sweet potato production constraints, adoption of the crops, impact of growing the two crops on livelihood assets. Présentation

Version intégrale

Page publiée le 29 novembre 2022