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Van Hall Larenstein University of Applied Sciences (2011)

Interaction of coping strategies as determined by rainfall : the case of Turkana riverine smallholders, Kenya

AKUJAH, Protus Ewesit

Titre : Interaction of coping strategies as determined by rainfall : the case of Turkana riverine smallholders, Kenya

Auteur : AKUJAH, Protus Ewesit

Université de soutenance : Van Hall Larenstein University of Applied Sciences

Grade : Master in Management of Development Specialisation in Rural Development and Food Security 2011

Résumé
This study examines the interaction of coping strategies pursued by Turkana riverine smallholders as determined by rainfall related adversity. The research explored the reasons why certain households pursue particular strategies and not others between and within the same socioeconomic groups in the same context with the aim to generate information that can be used to design suitable projects that can respond to different specific needs of vulnerable households or complement local coping strategies sustainably. Using interview data on sources of livelihoods, different socio-economic groups of riverine smallholders categorized their sources of livelihoods into principal and complementary sources. During period of rainfall crisis, principal sources were lacking and all socio-economic households pursued multiple complementary sources to compensate the failed principal sources. Rainfall in Kalemunyang and Napeikar was categorized as highly erratic and unreliable, both in frequency, distribution and amount. This poses a negative impact on riverine farming and food security among the riverine smallholders presenting a bleak picture for the future riverine smallholders’ food security and incomes. From the analysis on shock experience on coping strategies related to rainfall variability, Kalemunyang and Napeikar respondents’ responses were categorically grouped into five types of coping strategies namely alternative income strategies, sale of asset, changes in diet, external support and labour adjustment. From the results, there was no important difference between coping strategies engaged by different socio-economic groups by gender. Alternative income activities engaged in by middle and poor households contributed insufficient returns to the household such that sustaining the household livelihood assets was not possible. Survival for the fittest meant extensive utilization of natural resources (woodland) which poses a negative impact to the environment worsening rainfall variability which could set poor riverine households into a vicious cycle of poverty.

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Page publiée le 19 novembre 2022