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Accueil du site → Master → Pays Bas → 2019 → Modelling GHG emission, cost and benefit analysis within the dairy farming system - a case study of Githunguri Dairy Farmers Cooperative Society Ltd and Olenguruone Dairy Farmers Cooperative Society Ltd, Kenya

Van Hall Larenstein University of Applied Sciences (2019)

Modelling GHG emission, cost and benefit analysis within the dairy farming system - a case study of Githunguri Dairy Farmers Cooperative Society Ltd and Olenguruone Dairy Farmers Cooperative Society Ltd, Kenya

ANASTASIA VALA

Titre : Modelling GHG emission, cost and benefit analysis within the dairy farming system - a case study of Githunguri Dairy Farmers Cooperative Society Ltd and Olenguruone Dairy Farmers Cooperative Society Ltd, Kenya

Auteur : ANASTASIA VALA

Université de soutenance : Van Hall Larenstein University of Applied Sciences

Grade : Masters in Agricultural Production Chain Management, Livestock Chains Specialization 2019

Résumé
Understanding the effects of GHG emissions, cost and benefit analysis within the dairy farming system has become an important concern with respect to food security. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of climate-smart practices in the dairy farming systems centred on economic and environmental cost (GHG) emission and benefit analysis to advice the VHL (Van Hall Larenstein) consortium for the enhancement of scalable dairy farming systems on the inclusive and resilient business model. The study was conducted for farmers of Githunguri and Olenguruone dairy farmer’s cooperative society in Kenya. Purposive random sampling was done to identify 3 farmers in Githunguri,1 in Limuru and 2 in Olenguruone. Attributional LCA (life cycle analysis) was used to quantify the environmental impact upstream (feed transport and processing), downstream (dairy herd, feed, manure management and on-farm feed production). Results show that milk production had 7.58 Kg CO2 per litre, manure 0.126 Kg CO2, feed production 0.000053 Kg CO2 and feed transport 0.10545 Kg CO2. The carbon foot prints for the 6 farms when milk was allocated to other functions in dairy was 1.26 Kg CO2eq./kg of milk, 2.87 Kg CO2 eq.,1.87 Kg CO2 eq, 1.30 Kg CO2eq./kg, 1.41 Kg CO2 eq./Kg and 0.42 CO2 eq. The cost-benefit analysis of the climate-smart practices biogas production, water harvesting and solar panel show that farmers with climate-smart practices had an average net result per cow with CSA of Kshs. 49,127 while without CSA Kshs 41,275. Milk production, livestock category feed type and quality can vary enteric fermentation in a farm hence CH4. Therefore, farmers increasing their milk production and checking the type and quality of feed fed to the animal can lead to a reduction of GHG emissions in the farm. The adoption of climate-smart practices is not only a GHG reduction strategy on the farm but also a costbenefit item.

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