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Accueil du site → Doctorat → Pays-Bas → 2019 → Aid, donor coordination, and country ownership : Empirical evidence from Ethiopia

Radboud University Nijmegen (2019)

Aid, donor coordination, and country ownership : Empirical evidence from Ethiopia

Teshome, S.B.

Titre : Aid, donor coordination, and country ownership : Empirical evidence from Ethiopia

Auteur : Teshome, S.B.

Université de soutenance : Radboud University Nijmegen

Grade : Doctor 2019

Résumé partiel
Aid effectiveness has in the last 70 years always been debated not only in the academic world but also among policymakers, opinion leaders, and the general public. The traditional approach in development cooperation has been criticized because it was seen as mainly supply-driven, limiting not only the agency of the aid recipient but also leading to poor coordination. In response, as laid down in the Paris Declaration of 2005, ownership and coordination have become central concepts at the heart of the so-called ‘aid effectiveness agenda’. This ‘Paris Agenda’ set out a broader global framework of reform, underlining the stewardship role of the aid-recipients in development cooperation. Nevertheless, practically, implementation in accordance with the spirit of the Paris Agenda has been uneven, and coordination efforts seem generally to have led to a certain fatigue, sometimes even with an increasing trend in aid fragmentation. This mixed progress was also seen in the Paris Agenda survey of 2010 and the post-Busan evaluation of 2013, in which Ethiopia was portrayed as one of the good performers. These mixed results show the need for context-specific micro-level analysis to document empirical evidence on how the policy assumptions and objectives of the Paris Agenda are turned into practice in a given political economy context of a recipient country. In the case of Ethiopia, for example, studying country ownership and donor coordination dynamics in a ‘developmental state’ setting could tell a particularly important story. The purpose of this study was, therefore, to conduct in-country analysis on how the policy assumptions and objectives of the Paris Agenda were and are implemented in a ‘developmental state’ context and what then not only explains, but also involves ownership and effective donor coordination, substantiated by further empirical evidence at a sector level in Ethiopia. In that sense, this study tries to address the following main research question : How are policy assumptions guiding country ownership and coordination practiced in an aid-dependent developmental state, and what political economy factors and coordination approaches explain any divergences between the assumptions and the practices ?

This study specifically addresses the following research questions : a) How does the political economy context in Ethiopia influence the magnitude, sources, and composition of foreign aid flow throughout the evolution of donor-government relations across the three regimes in Ethiopia ? b) How do policy assumptions according to the Paris and Busan principles turn into practices in a ‘developmental state’ context like in Ethiopia, and how is country ownership explained in this process ? c) How do sector-specific factors explain effective coordination in the health sector in Ethiopia, and to what extent does this affect results being achieved ? and d) How do sector-specific factors explain effective coordination in the agriculture sector in Ethiopia, and to what extent are results being achieved in the context of country ownership ?

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