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Accueil du site → Doctorat → États-Unis → 2020 → Mungbean [Vigna radiata (L.) Wilczek] : Protein-rich Legume for Improving Soil Fertility and Diversifying Cropping Systems (Senegal)

Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (2020)

Mungbean [Vigna radiata (L.) Wilczek] : Protein-rich Legume for Improving Soil Fertility and Diversifying Cropping Systems (Senegal)

Diatta, Andre Amakobo

Titre : Mungbean [Vigna radiata (L.) Wilczek] : Protein-rich Legume for Improving Soil Fertility and Diversifying Cropping Systems (Senegal)

Auteur : Diatta, Andre Amakobo

Université de soutenance : Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University

Grade : Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) in Crop and Soil Environmental Sciences 2020

Résumé
Drought, salinity, and low soil fertility have negative impacts on agricultural productivity, resulting in food scarcity and nutritional insecurity, particularly in Sub-Saharan Africa. Mungbean [Vigna radiata (L.) R. Wilczek] has seen increased interest as a short-duration and drought tolerant legume crop, capable of atmospheric N₂ fixation. Mungbean is a protein and iron-rich legume and can be used as vegetable or grain for human consumption or multipurpose crop. At present, few studies have simultaneously explored the best agronomic practices for mungbean cultivation and evaluated its potential for increasing crop yields via intercropping systems and improving soil fertility through biological N₂ fixation. To understand the agronomic practices and soil physical properties limiting mungbean production, the impacts of two mungbean cultivars (Berken and OK2000) with and without inoculation with Bradyrhizobium spp. grown in loamy sand and silt loam soils on mungbean growth and yield were investigated under glasshouse conditions. Promising results from this study led to the introduction of mungbean into pearl millet systems in Senegal and evaluation of the effects of intercropping on growth, yields, land equivalent ratio (LER), canopy cover estimates, and normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI). Finally, we evaluated plant growth and N₂ fixation of five mungbean genotypes grown in two soil textures using the ¹⁵N natural abundance technique leading to recommendations for those with the greatest overall benefit to the cropping system.

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