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St. Paul’s University (2018)

Assessment of sanitation access and its effects on household’s livelihoods in Mathare Slums, Nairobi County, Kenya

Mang’uu, Cosmas Wambua

Titre : Assessment of sanitation access and its effects on household’s livelihoods in Mathare Slums, Nairobi County, Kenya

Auteur : Mang’uu, Cosmas Wambua

Université de soutenance : St. Paul’s University

Grade : Masters of Development Studies 2018

Résumé
Access to improved sanitation is one of the aspects that sustain good health, better standard of living and a key strategy to poverty alleviation. However, one-third of the world population, estimated to about 2.3 billion continue to miss on these benefits, with over 892 million having no sanitation facility at all. Majority of them are from Sub-Saharan Africa, with high poverty levels, who continue to bear the heavy burden of sanitation-related diseases, leading to perpetual vulnerability and loss of the limited households’ income owing to frequent medication and hospitalization. Thepurpose of the research was to find the current households sanitation access in Mathare slums, to assess the knowledge and practice gaps on sanitation and to establish the social-economic effects of poor sanitation to households’ livelihoods in the study area.Descriptiveresearch design wasused in this research while stratifiedand random sampling wereused for sampling. A sample size of 155 respondents/ household heads was selectedfrom the sample frame of about 50585 households. The researcher used questionnaires, interview and observations for data collection and a mobile data capture platform (Kobocollect) wasutilised.The collected data wasanalysedusing Microsoft Excel and the Statistical Package for Social Science (SPSS). The key findings of the study are : the average household’s sanitation accessfor the four wards is50%, withanother 45% using public toilets, while 4% borrowed from neighbours, and1% used buckets or paper bags ; access to toilets (pour flush and water closets) was at 44% while sewer connection was at 40% ;majority of the households had some background knowledge on the connection between diarrhea and general hygiene and sanitation, although some knowledge and practice gaps on the causes of diarrhea and practices to prevent such as use of toilets and water treatment where found. The low sanitation access coupled with knowledge and practices gaps was found to have a significant impact on household’s livelihoods. Economically, households were found to spend part of their income to access sanitation in public toilets, and also to cater for medications due to frequent diarrheal related ailments. Sanitation-related morbidity and mortality also impacted on household’s productivity and loss of income opportunities. Poor sanitation also exposed household members, mainly girls and women to rape, theft and physical injuries as well as poor quality of life and standard of living.

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