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St. Paul’s University (2018)

Household Water Security and adoption of safe drinking Water practices among Women with Children under five years in Nakuru Municipality Slums, Kenya

Wanyoike, Rosemary

Titre : Household Water Security and adoption of safe drinking Water practices among Women with Children under five years in Nakuru Municipality Slums, Kenya

Auteur : Wanyoike, Rosemary

Université de soutenance : St. Paul’s University

Grade : Masters of Development Studies 2018

Résumé
Sustainable development goal (SDG) number 3 calls upon the governments to “ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages”. Key strategies to realize improved healthy lives is ensuring every citizen has access to safe drinking water. Rapid urbanization continues to challenge government’s efforts of ensuring total coverage in water accessibility. Recent statistics indicate that the proportion of infants and children who die from illnesses related to unsafe water in the urban centers has exceeded the rate in Kenyan rural areas. The purpose of this research was to examine water security and the level of adoption of safe drinking water practices among women with children under five years in Nakuru, Kenya. Data were collected using researcher administered questionnaires from a sample of 182 women, purposively and proportionately drawn from four settlements, namely, Manyani, Murogi, Wagamata and Nyamarutu. Measurements variables included water accessibility, water security, water safety knowledge and practices. Quantitative data were analyzed using SPSS for descriptive statistics, correlation and hierarchical regression. Qualitative data were analyzed to identify key themes. Results showed that although all the women from the four settlements had access to an improved water source, water insecurity was a pervasive problem among majority of the women, particularly those from Wagamata, Murogi, and Nyamarutu. Differences in water security across the four settlements were statistically significant, F (3,178) = 32, p < 0.01. Nyamarutu had the highest proportion of water insecurity followed by Murogi and Wamagata respectively. Manyani had the highest percentage respondents who had fully adopted safe drinking water practices. Regression analysis results showed that household size, ease of access to water infrastructure, distance to water source, and time taken queuing for water were predictors of water security. Water insecurity negatively affected adoption of safe drinking water practices. The study recommended that, interventions by government and /or private partners that incentivize landlords to extend water within their premises be put in place to reduce the burden of water insecurity among women with children under five years.

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