Informations et ressources scientifiques
sur le développement des zones arides et semi-arides

Accueil du site → Master → Botswana → Impact of family chickens on the livelihoods of people living with HIV and AIDS and effects of stocking density on the growth performance of family chickens reared up to 18 weeks of age under intensive system

Botswana University of Agriculture and Natural Resources (BUANR) 2014

Impact of family chickens on the livelihoods of people living with HIV and AIDS and effects of stocking density on the growth performance of family chickens reared up to 18 weeks of age under intensive system

Gabanakgosi, Kenaleone

Titre : Impact of family chickens on the livelihoods of people living with HIV and AIDS and effects of stocking density on the growth performance of family chickens reared up to 18 weeks of age under intensive system

Auteur : Gabanakgosi, Kenaleone

Université de soutenance : Botswana University of Agriculture and Natural Resources (BUANR)

Grade : Master of Science in Animal Science 2014

Résumé partiel
Two studies were carried out to investigate the impact of family chicken component of BONEPWA+ on the livelihoods of people living with HIV and AIDS (PLWHA). In the first study, the impact of family chickens on the livelihoods of PLWHA was investigated in Khudumelapye, Mogobane, Mokubilo and Serowe villages of Botswana. The objectives of this study were to determine the consumption and marketing of family chickens and to evaluate the contribution of family chickens towards household income and nutrition of PLWHA in four villages. Data were collected from 100 respondents (25 from each village) using a structured questionnaire and through direct observation. The data was analysed using SPSS. The results showed that 79% of the respondents slaughtered chickens for family consumption and 21% to honour guests. Sixty-one percent of respondents consumed eggs while the remainder used eggs for breeding purposes. Seventy-four percent of the respondents sold some chickens to meet immediate family needs. Eighty-two percent of chickens were sold for cash followed by barter (10%). A total of 874 chickens were sold from the surveyed villages earning the sum of P18, 030.00 (2253.75USD). The average price of a chicken was P57.50 (7.19USD). Family chickens were mainly used for consumption and also sold to meet family needs, thus contributing to improved household income and nutrition of PLWHA. In order to increase the benefits of rearing family chickens, the rearers should be trained in general poultry management. In addition, the rearers should be encouraged to form associations which will assist in marketing chickens. In the second study, a total of 248 day old chicks were randomly assigned to four stocking densities D1, D2, D3 and D4 being 10 birds/m2, 13 birds/m2, 16 birds/m2 and 19 birds/m2 in the first phase (0-6 weeks) ; 8 birds/m2, 11 birds/m2, 14 birds/m2 and 17 birds/m2 in the second phase (7-12 weeks) and lastly 6 birds/m*, 9 birds/m*, 12 birds/m* and 15 birds/m* in the third phase (13-18 weeks) due to slaughtering which was done at the end of each phase in a completely randomized design. Birds were raised under intensive system in a lm2 pen and given commercial diets fed at ad libitum. The number of replicates per treatment was four. Parameters recorded included feed intake, body weight (BW), body weight gain (BWG), feed conversion ratio (FCR), mortality, final live weight, dressed weight and dressing percentage.

Présentation

Version intégrale (93 Mb)

Page publiée le 20 décembre 2022