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University of Botswana (2016)

Tourism development, rural livelihoods and land use conflicts resolution at Tachila Nature Reserve, NED, Botswana

Tafa, Unabo

Titre : Tourism development, rural livelihoods and land use conflicts resolution at Tachila Nature Reserve, NED, Botswana

Auteur : Tafa, Unabo

Université de soutenance : University of Botswana

Grade Masters of Philosophy In (Natural Resource Management) 2016

Résumé partiel
Land acquisition by the Tati Concession Company in the North East District (NED) of Botswana during Botswana’s colonial period (1885-1966) has created antagonism among the local people. The company (TC) demarcated land to white settlers and dispossessed the local people thus rendering them landless. TNR is found in the land owned by the TC and absentee landlords. In 2007, the governance structure of TNR was established. TNR is managed by a Board of Trustees (Tachila progress update, November 2012). The TNR project is developed on an area of approximately 81.93 square kilometers of freehold land. Local communities in the NED argue of having been dispossessed of their land during the Botswana’s colonial period.The objective of this study therefore is to assess the role of tourism in achieving rural livelihoods, conservation and land use conflict resolution in the NED using Tachila Nature Reserve (TNR) as a case study. The study was carried out at Matshelagabedi, Ditladi and Patayamatebele villages. The study is informed by the social exchange theory (SET). The study used a mixed method approach which includes both qualitative and quantitative research methods. The questionnaire was the data collection tool used and techniques such as interviews and focus-group discussions were also used. Primary sources and secondary data sources were also used. Face-to-face interviews with household representatives and TNR stakeholders were conducted. Informal interviews were also conducted with key informants such as village leadership at Ditladi, Patayamatebele, and Matshelagabedi. Secondary data sources include both published and unpublished materials on tourism development, livelihoods and natural resource management. Results indicate that even though local communities derive insignificant benefits from tourism at TNR, the tourism industry has the potential to contribute to improved rural livelihoods and conflict resolution.

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