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Accueil du site → Master → Afrique du Sud → 2021 → Nouvel articleIncreasing young children’s vegetable consumption : effectiveness of a behavioural intervention in an early childhood development centre in Botswana

University of South Africa (2021)

Nouvel articleIncreasing young children’s vegetable consumption : effectiveness of a behavioural intervention in an early childhood development centre in Botswana

Gumede, Ayanda Missy

Titre : Increasing young children’s vegetable consumption : effectiveness of a behavioural intervention in an early childhood development centre in Botswana

Auteur : Gumede, Ayanda Missy

Université de soutenance : University of South Africa

Grade : Master of Consumer Science 2021

Résumé
Although several studies have illustrated that the global population consumes a diet low in vegetables and fruits, there are still limited studies on health promoting strategies or interventions to help increase vegetable consumption in children at early childhood development (ECD) centres, especially in Southern Africa. It is important to address children’s eating behaviours early in childhood to increase dietary diversity, which will enable them to meet their nutritional requirements that support adequate growth and development as well as establish healthy eating behaviours into adulthood. Aim : The aim of this study was to determine the effect of a behavioural intervention on vegetable intake in children, aged 3 to 6 years, in an ECD centre in Gaborone, Botswana. Methods : A quasi-experimental study was conducted, employing the pre-test-post-test design. Firstly, data on habitual intake at home and at school was collected from parents and teachers respectively, using self-administered questionnaires. Children aged 3 to 6 years, from Dipeo Nursery School in Gaborone were provided with set portions of same-sized carrots and green beans on three respective days. On the second day, the social cognitive theory was applied through an intervention that consisted of posters of animated superhero cartoons promoting vegetable intake. The participants’ vegetable intake during the tests was assessed by counting the remaining number of vegetables on the plate and converted to the proportion consumed. Dependent t-tests were conducted to deduce inferences between pre-test, intervention, and post-test. Results : In total, 31 children were included in the study (17 boys, 14 girls). Parents reported carrots (65%), potatoes (61%) and tomatoes (55%) as the most frequent vegetables consumed in the preceding 24 hours. While the teachers reported cucumbers (91%), carrots (82%), corn (73%) and tomatoes (62%) as the most packed vegetables for school. Considering the intervention, there was no significant difference in the mean vegetable consumption (carrots and green beans) between the age groups on the pretest, intervention, or post-test days. For the total group, there was a significant increase in carrot consumption of 13.3% (t (30) = -3.99, p<0.001) from intervention (69.0, ±32.1%) to post-test (82.2, ±23.9%), as well as an increase of 7.1% from pre-test (75.1, ±28.3%) to post-test (82.2, ±23.9%), (t (30) = -2.09, p=0.045). Similarly, there was a 9% increase in green bean consumption (t (30) = -3.04, p=0.005) from intervention (53.1, ±36.6%) to post-test (62.1, ±35.0%). Conclusion : This study demonstrated that a behavioural intervention employing animated superhero cartoons paired with repeated exposure on three time points (pretest, intervention, and post-test) is effective in promoting vegetable intake in children aged 3 to 6 years in an ECD centre. It is recommended that children are encouraged to consume vegetables by means of visual characters and repeated exposure. Additionally, children should consume meals in an environment without distractions. The results of this study positively contribute to foundational data and demonstrate the need for further research on interventions on a larger scale.

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Page publiée le 8 janvier 2023