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Hawassa University (2007)

Production and marketing systems of sheep and goats in Alaba, Southern Ethiopia

KOCHO TSEDEKE KETEMA

Titre : Production and marketing systems of sheep and goats in Alaba, Southern Ethiopia

Auteur : KOCHO TSEDEKE KETEMA

Université de soutenance : Hawassa University

Grade : MASTER OF SCIENCE IN ANIMAL SCIENCES (SPECIALIZATION : ANIMAL PRODUCTION) 2007

Résumé partiel
This study has undertaken to describe the sheep and goat production and marketing systems and identify constraints to and improvement options for smallholder farms of Alaba, southern Ethiopia. Results are based on survey of 150 sample households and rapid appraisal of major sheep and goat markets. Flock distribution and holdings in different parts of the woreda vary and thus the study sites were stratified into mixed sheep-goat flock, goat dominating and sheep dominating sites. Average family size of the study area was 6.7. Literacy of household heads accounts 30%. Across the sites, mean holdings of total land, grazing land, cattle, sheep, goat and equine numbers varied significantly (P<0.05) with the goat dominating site having higher values) than the others. With respect to livestock holdings above half of the total TLU was recorded in goat dominant site. The mean holding of 7.4 sheep (P<0.05) and 11.5 goats (P<0.05), respectively are higher in sheep and goat dominating sites. Sheep and goats are primarily kept for sale to generate cash and majorities (98.9%) of goat owners extensively milk their flock for household consumption. Sucking young (22.8% lambs ; 26.7% kids) and breeding female (39.3% ewes ; 39.4% does) dominate the flock. Respondents reported that grazing on crop stubble (13.4%), private pastures (13.3%) and road sides (13.2%), weeds (11.6%), tillers and fillers (8.9%) from crop fields, cut-and-carry of browse species and grasses (9.1%) and communal pastures (9.4%) are major feedstuffs of sheep and goats. Flock water are largely comes from rivers (Bilate and Dijo) (55.2%), artificial ponds (21.9%), trough and harvested water

Mots Clés : Sheep, Goats, Smallholder farmers, Production systems, Marketing systems, Constraints, Improvement options, Alaba, Southern Ethiopia.

Présentation (Mahider)

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Page publiée le 2 avril 2011, mise à jour le 7 avril 2020