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Universitetet i Oslo (UiO) (2010)

Small Scale Irrigation Schemes and Sustainable Livelihoods in the Kassena-Nankana West District of the Upper East Region of Ghana

Achana, Thomas Wedam Godwin

Titre : Small Scale Irrigation Schemes and Sustainable Livelihoods in the Kassena-Nankana West District of the Upper East Region of Ghana

Auteur : Achana, Thomas Wedam Godwin

Université de soutenance : Universitetet i Oslo (UiO)

Grade : Master thesis 2010

Résumé
This thesis examines two Small Scale Irrigation Schemes in the Kassena Nankana West District of the Upper East Region of Ghana, as a poverty intervention measure. And the aim is to study how a relevant poverty intervention measure can be effectively introduced and made to empower the people as it has been designed to do. The study, through personal interviews using the questionnaire, Focus Group Discussions (FGDs) and personal observation, discovered that the people were generally satisfied with the performance of the schemes. However, within the framework of the Sustainable Livelihoods Approach (SLA), the study uncovered several obstacles to the optimum performance of the schemes. First, the implementation of the schemes was not properly done as stakeholders were not actively involved in the process. Issues of equitable distribution and access to land, water and inputs as well as technical support services were not adequately addressed. Second, the ability to operate and manage the schemes with some degree of efficiency for optimum results was missing in the various communities. The outcome was a minimum level of performance and the ultimate acceptance of the status qou. So despite claims by the people that they were satisfied with the performance of the schemes, which was also backed by statistics gathered in the field, the study concludes otherwise. This apparent divergent view is a result of the low expectations of the people in these communities regarding the performance of the schemes due partly to their inability to properly operate and manage the schemes. Third, there was no proper coordination between departments relating to the schemes. This meant challenges facing the schemes were not being addressed as roles were not clearly defined for the various departments. The study concludes that there is no substitute for building the capacity of the people to take control of their own affairs if poverty intervention measures are to yield a substantial benefit for the people concerned and be devoid of political talk.

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Page publiée le 13 avril 2011, mise à jour le 11 février 2018