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Accueil du site → Master → Etats Unis → 2004 → Mycorrhization patterns in Bromus tectorum from salt desert and sagebrush habitats of The Great Basin, Nevada

University of Nevada, Reno (2004)

Mycorrhization patterns in Bromus tectorum from salt desert and sagebrush habitats of The Great Basin, Nevada

Embry, Saundra J.

Titre : Mycorrhization patterns in Bromus tectorum from salt desert and sagebrush habitats of The Great Basin, Nevada

Auteur : Embry, Saundra J.

Université de soutenance : University of Nevada, Reno

Degree : Master of Science (MS) 2004

Résumé
Invasive Bromus tectorum (cheatgrass) has promoted fire in Great Basin rangelands causing a decline in native species cover over vast areas. Over the past two decades, cheatgrass has spread from upland sagebrush habitats into salt desert communities where it fuels wildfires. It is possible that mycorrhizal associates have facilitated cheatgrass invasion into salt desert communities. Cheatgrass is a facultative host for mycorrhizal fungi, but mycorrhizal associations across the range of habitats it occupies are not well understood. Mycorrhiza may negatively affect plants if they incur too much of a carbon cost. My research evaluated potential effects of soil and seed source on mycorrhization in cheatgrass focusing on comparisons of mycorrhization in plants grown from different seed populations on sagebrush versus salt desert soils. These data suggest evidence of local adaptation (p<.01) and further show that mycorrhizae are not mutualists in cheatgrass from salt deserts, despite its successful invasion there

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Page publiée le 20 mai 2011, mise à jour le 31 octobre 2018