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University of Manitoba (2010)

Living with climate change : how prairie farmers deal with increasing weather variability

Pearce, Kent

Titre : Living with climate change : how prairie farmers deal with increasing weather variability

Auteur : Pearce, Kent

Université de soutenance : University of Manitoba

Grade : Master of Natural Resources Mangement (MNRM) 2010.

Résumé
This thesis explores the concepts of resilience, adaptation and vulnerability of the Saskatchewan prairie agroecosystem to extreme weather events. The objectives of this research were (1) To determine how producers responded to weather related shocks and stresses ; (2) To determine commonalities between successful area farmers and(3) To modify CRISTAL as a research tool. The research was based on 23 producer interviews conducted in the vicinity of Regina, SK and 15 interviewees conducted near Estevan SK, referred as the northern and the southern study area, respectively. Interviewees were structured using the computer based software "CRISTAL" and were completed between December 2006 and August 2007. Questions were focused within the time frame of 2001-2007, and aimed to determine (1)which recent weather events had a significant impact on farming operations ; (2) the impacts of these events ; (3) coping strategies to the weather events and (4)resources important to coping strategies. Results indicatethat both the south and the north study areas had been affected by weather events, primarily early frost, drought, flooding/excessive moisture and hail. Some producers actively adjusted their farming operations through innovations such as zero till, education and expert advice, direct marketing, ’next generation management’, interdependence and speciality crop. These farmers, as compared to the others, fared better through extreme weather events and were better suited to react to future weather occurrences. Findings also suggest that government programs which were proactive in nature in responding to weather events where popular amongst producers and had more value than older, reactive government programs.

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Page publiée le 5 novembre 2011, mise à jour le 5 février 2018