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Wageningen University (2010)

Milking drylands : gender networks, pastoral markets and food security in stateless Somalia

Nori Michele

Titre : Milking drylands : gender networks, pastoral markets and food security in stateless Somalia

Auteur : Nori Michele

Université de soutenance : Wageningen University

Grade : PhD thesis 2010

Résumé partiel
The Somali economy historically hinges around mobile livestock rearing. Pastoral resource management at local level has become increasingly intertwined within regional and international market systems. Such patterns have undergone dramatic changes in the last two decades ; the collapse of the central state, with the fall of Siad Barre’s regime, has reflected and induced major societal reshaping. The clan-based structure of the Somali society has regained its prominence, leading to violent conflict in some areas and innovative patterns of governance in others. Population movements and economic dynamics emanating from these conditions have further contributed to the remoulding of access to, and utilisation of, resources amongst Somali pastoralists.

Milk is important in Somali culture. Most milk is from dromedary camels, of which Somalia has more than 6 million, which is almost half the world’s total. They are raised almost exclusively for their milk, the local staple food. The role of camel milk as an income generator in NE Somalia is quite recent as the sale of camel milk was considered a taboo until recently – as it still is in other parts of the Horn of Africa. Previous reported experiences of its commercialization in Somalia relate to the late 1980s, when camel milk marketing networks were established in southern Somalia to serve demand from the capital city, Mogadishu. As a result of the civil strife that has remoulded the Somali socio-economic fabric, camel milk has increasingly become a marketable commodity in other parts of the Somali ecosystem and its trade has developed accordingly.

Mots clés : sociology / pastoralism / pastoral society / livestock farming / camel milk / dromedaries / milk / milk production / socioeconomics / market milk / milk marketing / food security / development / resource management / east africa / least developed countries / somalia / women / state / gender / networks / livelihood strategies / governance

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Page publiée le 14 novembre 2011, mise à jour le 30 mai 2022