Informations et ressources scientifiques
sur le développement des zones arides et semi-arides

Accueil du site → Brèves → Brèves 2011 → Development in Fog Harvesting Process May Make Water Available to the World’s Poor

Development in Fog Harvesting Process May Make Water Available to the World’s Poor

ScienceDaily (Apr. 21, 2011)

Development in Fog Harvesting Process May Make Water Available to the World’s Poor

ScienceDaily (Apr. 21, 2011)

In the arid Namib Desert on the west coast of Africa, one type of beetle has found a distinctive way of surviving. When the morning fog rolls in, the Stenocara gracilipes species, also known as the Namib Beetle, collects water droplets on its bumpy back, then lets the moisture roll down into its mouth, allowing it to drink in an area devoid of flowing water.

What nature has developed, Shreerang Chhatre wants to refine, to help the world’s poor. This way, poor villagers could collect clean water near their homes, instead of spending hours carrying water from distant wells or streams.

One basic principle of a good fog-harvesting device is that it must have a combination of surfaces that attract and repel water. For instance, the shell of Stenocara gracilipes has bumps that attract water and troughs that repel it ; this way, drops collects on the bumps, then run off through the troughs without being absorbed, so that the water reaches the beetle’s mouth.

A fog-harvesting device consists of a fence-like mesh panel, which attracts droplets, connected to receptacles into which water drips. Chhatre’s training as a chemical engineer has focused on the wettability of materials, their tendency to either absorb or repel liquids

Pour en savoir plus (ScienceDaily)

Page publiée le 18 novembre 2011, mise à jour le 2 août 2014