Informations et ressources scientifiques
sur le développement des zones arides et semi-arides

Accueil du site → Brèves → Brèves 2010 → Aboriginal Hunting and Burning Increase Australia’s Desert Biodiversity

Aboriginal Hunting and Burning Increase Australia’s Desert Biodiversity

ScienceDaily (May 3, 2010)}

Aboriginal Hunting and Burning Increase Australia’s Desert Biodiversity

ScienceDaily (May 3, 2010)

In Australia, Martu hunter-gatherers light fires to expose the hiding places of their prey : monitor lizards called goanna that can grow up to 6 feet long. These generations-old hunting practices, part of the Martu day-to-day routine, have reshaped Australia’s Western Desert habitats, according to Stanford University anthropologists Douglas and Rebecca Bird.

"Martu" refers to a group of about 800 indigenous Australians from eight dialect-groups that inhabit the Western Desert. For 10 years, the Birds have been investigating Martu hunting strategies and their lasting environmental impacts. With support from the Woods Institute for the Environment at Stanford, the researchers have begun to explore what makes aboriginal hunting grounds molded by fire more biologically diverse than lands untouched by humans.

"The results of our work will be used to assist conservation efforts and joint indigenous land management policy in the Western Desert," said Douglas Bird, an assistant professor (research) of anthropology and principal investigator on the Woods Institute Environmental Venture Projects grant.

Pour en savoir plus (ScienceDaily)

Page publiée le 19 novembre 2011, mise à jour le 4 août 2014