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Accueil du site → Master → Afrique du Sud → 2009 → Potential of sorghum and finger millet to enhance household food security in Zimbabwe’s semi-arid regions : a case study of communal areas in Masvingo Province

University of Fort Hare (2009)

Potential of sorghum and finger millet to enhance household food security in Zimbabwe’s semi-arid regions : a case study of communal areas in Masvingo Province

Mukarumbwa Peter

Titre : Potential of sorghum and finger millet to enhance household food security in Zimbabwe’s semi-arid regions : a case study of communal areas in Masvingo Province

Auteur : Peter Mukarumbwa

Université de soutenance : University of Fort Hare

Grade : Master of Science (MS) 2009

Résumé
Successive droughts, in Zimbabwe compounded by other economic shocks in recent years have resulted in decreased maize productivity amongst the communal farmers most of whom reside in regions IV and V which are considered semi-arid. This has given rise to the need to find alternative food crops, which may be suitable for these areas. Generally, research in the world indicates that sorghum and millet have the potential to end chronic food insecurity in semi-arid areas because of their drought tolerance. Whilst this might be the case, research, government policy and assistance from non-governmental organizations on food crop production in Zimbabwe have shown a continual inclination to maize production in semi-arid areas. However, maize is regarded as a high risk crop in these regions. The main objective of the study was to investigate major factors affecting smallholder farmers in semi-arid areas, from increased production of small grains, specifically sorghum and finger millet. The study was conducted in two rural districts of Masvingo and Gutu, which lie in natural region IV in Masvingo Province. The questionnaire was used as the main tool of inquiry to gather data from households in selected villages within these districts. Questionnaires were administered through face-to-face interviews. The total sample size was 120. The logistic regression model was used to analyze data. The results revealed that, at the 5% level, labour, cattle ownership, farm size, age, extension, yields and access to credit significantly influence sorghum and finger millet production. These findings suggest that an adjustment in each one of the significant variables can significantly influence the probability of participation in small grain production. In view of these research findings, a policy shift that encourages increased production of finger millet and sorghum in Zimbabwe‟s semi-arid regions is proposed. It is suggested that this may increase household food security in these regions

Mots clés : Food Security Supply Crops Zimbabwe Finger millet Sorghum Poverty Case studies Masvingo Crops

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Page publiée le 31 décembre 2011, mise à jour le 1er juillet 2017