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Accueil du site → Master → Etats Unis → 1988 → Potential ground-water resources and decrease in natural flow of wells in Dakhla Oases, Western Desert, Egypt

University of Arizona (1988)

Potential ground-water resources and decrease in natural flow of wells in Dakhla Oases, Western Desert, Egypt

El Ghonemy, Hamdi Mohamed Riad

Titre : Potential ground-water resources and decrease in natural flow of wells in Dakhla Oases, Western Desert, Egypt

Auteur : El Ghonemy, Hamdi Mohamed Riad

Université de soutenance : University of Arizona.

Grade : Master of Science (MS) 1988

Résumé
The Nubian Aquifer System is the primary aquifer in the Western Desert of Egypt. The Dakhla Oases are among five other oases relying on this aquifer as the only source of water. The water-bearing layers are mainly porous Cretaceous sandstones overlain by predominantly marine shales and clays of Late Cretaceous to Lower Paleocene age. Ground water occurs under artesian conditions causing the wells to flow freely for both human and agricultural needs. The present annual ground-water discharge in Dakhla is 2.09 x 10⁸ cubic meters. The natural movement of ground water into the Dakhla area is negligible in terms of recharge to the artesian zones. A review of previous investigations indicated a projected drawdown of up to 75 meters by the year 2025. Extensive extraction from the deep layers has led to a decrease in the piezometric pressure, causing vertical flow from the upper layers. The decrease in natural flow of the artesian wells is due to this decline in natural pressure. Egypt is in great need of its ground-water supply. In the context of population growth and greater demands for water, the value of water in Egypt will rise in the near future particularly in response to the imminent threat of African drought.

Mots clés : Hydrology. — Groundwater flow — Egypt — Dakhla Oasis. — Groundwater — Egypt — Dakhla Oasis

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Page publiée le 17 mai 2012, mise à jour le 20 février 2018