Informations et ressources scientifiques
sur le développement des zones arides et semi-arides

Accueil du site → Doctorat → États-Unis → 2004 → Flexibility of household structure : Economic motivations and consequences of child fostering in Burkina Faso

Yale University (2004)

Flexibility of household structure : Economic motivations and consequences of child fostering in Burkina Faso

Akresh, Richard Seth

Titre  : Flexibility of household structure : Economic motivations and consequences of child fostering in Burkina Faso

Auteur  : Akresh, Richard Seth,

Université de soutenance : YALE UNIVERSITY

Grade : Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) 2004

Résumé
This dissertation uses data collected by the author in Burkina Faso to understand the institution of child fostering, in which parents send their biological children to live with another family, and to measure the welfare implications of that decision. Based on these data, 27 percent of households either sent or received a foster child between 1998 and 2000. Chapter 2 describes the survey methodology, the fieldwork definitions, and the sampling frame. The data collection involved a tracking methodology so as to survey both the sending and receiving household involved in each fostering exchange, which enables a better understanding of the fostering impact on the host siblings, the foster child, and the foster child’s non-fostered biological siblings. Chapter 3 examines why a household decides to foster a child. I present a theoretical framework, in which children are efficiently allocated across households in a social network, to motivate three factors influencing the household fostering decision. A household fosters children as a risk-coping mechanism in response to exogenous income shocks, if it has a better quality social network, and to satisfy labor demands within the household. Empirical evaluation of these three covariates finds that they significantly influence the household sending decision, but not the decision to receive a child. Increases of one standard deviation in a household’s shock, percentage of good network members, or number of older girls, increase the probability of sending a child above the current level of fostering by twenty-eight, twenty, and thirty-four percent, respectively. Chapter 4 measures the welfare impact of child fostering on school enrollment. Researchers have claimed that children growing up away from their biological parents may be at a disadvantage and have lower human capital investment. To address the endogeneity of fostering, I estimate household and child fixed effects regressions. Foster children are no less likely to be enrolled after fostering than their host siblings but are 4.9 percent more likely to be enrolled than their biological siblings. Relative to children from non-fostering households, host siblings, biological siblings, and foster children experience increased enrollment after the fostering exchange.

Présentation (PROQUEST)

Page publiée le 20 septembre 2005, mise à jour le 22 août 2017