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Arizona State University (2010)

Identifying the Origin and Evolution of Groundwater in the Salt River Valley and Applications for Better Water Well Design : A Stable Isotopic Approach

Bond, Angela Nicole

Titre : Identifying the Origin and Evolution of Groundwater in the Salt River Valley and Applications for Better Water Well Design : A Stable Isotopic Approach

Auteur : Bond, Angela Nicole

Université de soutenance : Arizona State University (ASU)

Grade : M.S. Geological Sciences 2010

Résumé
Stable isotopes were measured in the groundwaters of the Salt River Valley basin in central Arizona to explore the utility of stable isotopes for sourcing recharge waters and engineering better well designs. Delta values for the sampled groundwaters range from -7.6‰ to -10‰ in δ 18O and -60‰ to -91‰ in δD and display displacements off the global meteoric water line indicative of surficial evaporation during river transport into the area. Groundwater in the basin is all derived from top-down river recharge ; there is no evidence of ancient playa waters even in the playa deposits. The Salt and Verde Rivers are the dominant source of groundwater for the East Salt River valley- the Agua Fria River also contributes significantly to the West Salt River Valley. Groundwater isotopic compositions are generally more depleted in 18O and D with depth, indicating past recharge in cooler climates, and vary within subsurface aquifer layers as sampled during well drilling. When isotopic data were evaluated together with geologic and chemical analyses and compared with data from the final well production water it was often possible to identify : 1) which horizons are the primary producers of groundwater flow and how that might change with time, 2) the chemical exchange of cations and anions via water-rock interaction during top-down mixing of recharge water with older waters, 3) how much well production might be lost if arsenic-contributing horizons were sealed off, and 4) the extent to which replacement wells tap different subsurface water sources. In addition to identifying sources of recharge, stable isotopes offer a new and powerful approach for engineering better and more productive water wells.

Subject : Groundwater / Salt River Valley / Isotopes

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Page publiée le 14 avril 2014, mise à jour le 22 février 2019