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Accueil du site → Master → Kenya → 2001 → Tile impact of small community dams on Arid and Semi Arid Lands (ASALs) development. A case study of Gachoka division in Mbeere district

University of Nairobi (2001)

Tile impact of small community dams on Arid and Semi Arid Lands (ASALs) development. A case study of Gachoka division in Mbeere district

Ngari, Stephen

Titre : Tile impact of small community dams on Arid and Semi Arid Lands (ASALs) development. A case study of Gachoka division in Mbeere district

Auteur : Ngari, Stephen

Université de soutenance : University of Nairobi

Grade : Master of Arts in Planning (2001)

Résumé
Gachoka Division of Mbeere District is a semi arid area. Water is scarce in most part of the division. In 1970, the area was supplied with a piped water but due to mismanagement, the water supply is no longer functional. In 1979, the Government through the Ministry of Agriculture established a Dam Construction Unit in the area with the aim of soil and water conservation. In order to effectively conserve the soil and water in the area they started construction of small community dams. Since then 43 small community dams have been constructed by the Government, Non-governmental Organizations and Religious Based Organizations. Due to rainfall unreliability in arid and semi-arid areas there is need to conserve water during the rainy season for use during the dry season through construction of both surface and subsurface darns. This study undertook to investigate the impact of these dams on the recipient communities. It analyzed the government policies on water and Arid and Semi Arid Lands (ASALs) rural development since independence. This study also analyzed the sources of water before dams were constructed, the sources of water during the rainy and dry season. It has also looked at the method of water transport and the drawers of water. The study has also analyzed the various uses of the water and how the dams are currently managed by the users. The study has revealed that the dams are appropriate for storing water during the rainy season for use during the dry season. The study has confirmed that the water from the dams have been beneficial to the communities where the water is used for irrigation, which has created employment by people selling the water which is used for irrigation. TIllS act as a source of income during the dry season when there is no on farm employment. The water is also used for rearing exotic dairy cattle, watering tree nurseries and selling the water in the local market centres. This study also looked at the management aspect of the dams, and it revealed that the dams require proper management to avoid siltation and misuse, Those dams where the communities were not involved from construction to implementation were found to have no management committees, were not fenced and there was no control on the use of the water leading to direct watering of animals in the dams which pollutes the water. Where communities were involved throughout the dam planning, construction and implementation the dams had user management committees, were fenced and there was control of the water use by the communities through their elected management committees. The study has recommended that the construction of the small community dams should be combined with intensive soil conservation practices and catchment protection through afforestation. Since this area is part of the catchment area of Tana river with Kamburu, Gitaru, Kiambere and Kindaruma hydroelectric power generating dams downstream the combination of water and soil conservation through the-construction of small dams would be beneficial to the local community by increasing their access to more water and at the same time reducing the ’siltation in Hydro Electric Power (H.E.P) dams hence enhancing their capacity to produce electricity, which will be beneficial to the.nation as a whole

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Page publiée le 2 octobre 2014, mise à jour le 26 mars 2018