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Accueil du site → Doctorat → États-Unis → 2006 → A land of plenty : Depression-era mining and landscape capital in the Mojave Desert, California

UNIVERSITY OF NEVADA, RENO (2006)

A land of plenty : Depression-era mining and landscape capital in the Mojave Desert, California

Smith, Jessica L. K

Titre : A land of plenty : Depression-era mining and landscape capital in the Mojave Desert, California

Auteur : Smith, Jessica L. K

Université de soutenance : UNIVERSITY OF NEVADA, RENO

Grade : Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) 2006

Résumé
Despite the unpredictability of non-renewable resource extraction, extreme financial hardship, and severe materials’ shortages, gold mining provided a viable source of income for many in the American West during the Great Depression. Many Depression-era mining operations occurred in old mining districts, as miners re-worked, re-processed, and re-inhabited abandoned mining landscapes. Thus, Depression-era mining successes can, in part, be attributed to the miners’ use of landscape capital, or the physical remains of previous mining activity, as a source of information or knowledge about the surrounding landscape. Two mining districts with long histories of mining activity in and around the Mojave Desert’s Joshua Tree National Park contain ample evidence of the exploitation of landscape capital by miners in the 1930s. Based on the historical and archaeological research of seven mines, the Supply, Carlyle, Los Angeles, Desert Queen, Lost Horse, New Eldorado, and Golden Bee, this work will demonstrate that not only was the use of landscape capital integral to the success of mining projects during the Great Depression, but miners employed their “inherited” capital as knowledge and as financial assets in patterned and predictable ways.

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Page publiée le 16 septembre 2006, mise à jour le 31 octobre 2018