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Dayalbagh Educational Institute (2008)

Study on the systematics of semi-arid zone mosquitoes and screening them for resistance to selected Larvicides

Singh, Gavendra

Titre : Study on the systematics of semi-arid zone mosquitoes and screening them for resistance to selected Larvicides

Auteur : Singh, Gavendra

Université de soutenance : Dayalbagh Educational Institute

Grade : Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) 2008

Résumé partiel
Mosquito is one of the most medically significant arthropod vectors as obligate intermediate host to a number of parasites and pathogens. Mosquitoes transmit chronic and debilitating diseases such as Malaria, Yellow fever, Dengue, Japanese encephalitis, and Lymphatic filariasis in humans which create global health problems. Large amount of money is being spent every year worldwide to combat these diseases. In India, Anopheles stephensi Liston, An. culicifacies Giles, Culex quinquefasciatus Say, Aedes aegypti Linn are among the most important vector of diseases.

Malaria now is responsible for estimated 300 million people fall ill and there are more than one million deaths per year (WHO, 2005, 2007). Dengue is viral infection that has become a major global public health concern in recent years. A rapid rise in urban populations is bringing ever greater numbers of people into contact with the predominantly urban species Ae. aegypti. Some 2500 million people, two fifths of the world’s populations are now at risk from Dengue. Currently estimates there may be 50 million cases of Dengue infection worldwide every year (WHO 2007). Japanese encephalitis is a mosquito-borne arbovirus infection, with seasonal distribution. The disease, which is transmitted by Culex mosquitoes, and endemic in most parts of Asia. On average, 1 in 300 infections results in symptomatic illness. The illness can progress to encephalitis and can be fatal in 30% of these cases (WHO, 2007). Lymphatic filariasis or Elephantiasis is transmitted by mosquitoes that bite infected humans. Over 120 million people are currently infected and around 1.3 billion people in more than 80 countries are at risk of infection (WHO, 2007).

These diseases are increasing every year. Therefore, it becomes essential to control mosquito population to prevent people from mosquito borne diseases. Now, there is fast ecological changes have been recorded in environment. These ecological changes affect the behavior, morphology, and emergence of new species of mosquitoes. Therefore, the continuous field surveys are essential. Moreover, studies on the mosquitoes systematics is essential for their correct identification keys. These mosquitoes are screened from different larvicides with the bioassay data and enzymes for resistance studies. The climatic change requires new effective management of larvicides resistance entails the use of several un- related insecticides in combination or rotation strategy on known mosquito and new mosquito species for their control.

Présentation et version intégrale (Shodhganga)

Page publiée le 14 octobre 2014, mise à jour le 1er février 2021