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Accueil du site → Doctorat → Royaume-Uni → 2007 → The development of a heavy thunderstorm climatology in Saudi Arabia based on observations, analyses and numerical simulations

University of East Anglia (2007)

The development of a heavy thunderstorm climatology in Saudi Arabia based on observations, analyses and numerical simulations

Ghulam, Ayman S.

Titre : The development of a heavy thunderstorm climatology in Saudi Arabia based on observations, analyses and numerical simulations

Auteur : Ghulam, Ayman S.

Université de soutenance : University of East Anglia

Grade : Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) 2007

Résumé
This study also aims to provide useful information on thunderstorm distribution and prediction to the local forecasters in Saudi Arabia to improve forecasting methods for all seasons. It was found that the study area presents many challenging meteorological problems. The synoptic climate has not previously been well documented and thereafter, it is poorly understood. Thus, this study provides, for the first time a long term (44-year) synoptic climatology in Saudi Arabia based on ECMWF (ERA-40 reanalysis and operational) datasets. No thunderstorm climatology current exists for Saudi Arabia ; it is difficult to capture the high temporal/spatial variability of thunderstorms in Saudi Arabia due to lack of observation network coverage. Thus, this study has to include elements including satellite based data. By utilizing data from satellite-borne lightening detectors, is now possible to learn about thunderstorm distribution, especially in places where not enough surface stations such as Saudi Arabia. Reports of thunderstorms using surface observational data in Saudi Arabia are compared here with satellite based lightening data. Modelling work concerning meteorological issues is severely limited in Saudi Arabia. In this study the PSU/NCAR MM5 model was adopted, for the first time, to stimulate heavy thunderstorm events associated with rainfall (≥10mm/day) to help simulate the synoptic and meso-scale environments conductive to heavy thunderstorm events in Saudi Arabia and understand their formation mechanisms. Three nested numerical experiments have been performed with grid resolutions of 135, 45, and 15 km. The spatial and temporal distribution of simulated heavy thunderstorms offered evidence linking to additional local effect factors such as terrain, high insolation leading to instability, low-level convergence zones, sea-land breezes and the interaction between flow and topography.

Présentation (ETHOS)

Accès au document : Proquest Dissertations & Theses

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