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Accueil du site → Master → Afrique du Sud → Metabolic responses to hyperthermia in two small desert mammals, the Pygmy rock mouse, Petromyscus Collinus and the Namaqua rock mouse, Aethomys Namaquensis

University of KwaZulu-Natal (2012)

Metabolic responses to hyperthermia in two small desert mammals, the Pygmy rock mouse, Petromyscus Collinus and the Namaqua rock mouse, Aethomys Namaquensis

Mowoe, Metoboroghene Oluwaseyi

Titre : Metabolic responses to hyperthermia in two small desert mammals, the Pygmy rock mouse, Petromyscus Collinus and the Namaqua rock mouse, Aethomys Namaquensis

Auteur : Mowoe, Metoboroghene Oluwaseyi

Université de soutenance : University of KwaZulu-Natal

Grade : Master of Science (MS) 2012

Résumé partiel
The negative consequence of recent climate change on the Earth’s biodiversity has become more evident in recent years. Some animals, due to insularity or habitat fragmentation, are unable to shift their ranges altitudinally and latitudinally. Vulnerable species need to rely on behavioural and, more importantly, physiological responses in order to persist through present climatic changes. It has therefore become more obvious that physiological responses of individuals need to be incorporated into predictive models of the responses of mammals to accelerated climate change. The primary purpose of this study was to test the ‘Hyperthermic Daily Torpor’ hypothesis proposed recently by Lovegrove et al., (in press). The hypothesis suggests that, based on albeit limited evidence, some small mammals may be capable of hyperthermia induced hypometabolism equivalent to that experienced during torpor and hibernation in response to cold temperatures. These authors argue that such hyperthermic hypometabolism should reduce the risk of entry into pathological hyperthermia and also reduce the rate of water loss driven by heat-induced evaporative cooling. The reaction norms of desert mammals have been selected to be adaptive over a wide range of climatic conditions due to the unpredictability of their habitat. Thus, they are good models for testing the reaction norms that may be expressed in response to accelerated climate change. We therefore tested our hypothesis using two presumably heat-adapted desert rodents ; the Namaqua rock mouse, Aethomys namaquensis, and the pygmy rock mouse, Petromyscus collinus, as model species. We used indirect respirometry to measure metabolic rate at high ambient temperatures. We progressively exposed the animals to high temperatures to induce thermal tolerance and thus minimize the risks of lethal hyperthermia. We also measured subcutaneous and core temperatures, using temperature-sensitive PIT tags (BioTherm Identipet) and modified iButtons (Maxim Integrated), respectively. A. namaquensis displayed the capacity for hyperthermia-induced hypometabolism (Q10 79 = 1.27 ± 1.61) whereas the P. collinus did not (Q10 = 2.45 ± 1.41). The implications of such a physiological response in A. namaquensis are crucial in terms of its capacity to minimize the risks of lethal, pathological hyperthermia. Recent models of endothermic responses to global warming based on ectothermic models predict a dichotomy in the thermoregulatory responses of mammals to high temperatures. This study, to our knowledge, provides some of the first data on these interspecific variations in the thermoregulatory responses of mammals to high temperatures.

Mots clés : Rodents—Africa, Southern—Physiology — Desert animals—Physiology— Mice— Metabolism. — Body temperature—Regulation. — Measurement

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Page publiée le 29 décembre 2014, mise à jour le 11 juin 2018