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Veterinärmedizinische Universität Wien (2012)

Insights from evolutionary history and population genetics for domestic and wildlife conservation cases of the Old World camelids and cheetahs

Charruau, Pauline

Titre : Insights from evolutionary history and population genetics for domestic and wildlife conservation cases of the Old World camelids and cheetahs

Auteur : Charruau, Pauline

Université de soutenance : Veterinärmedizinische Universität Wien

Grade : Doctoral thesis 2012

Résumé
Conservation of biodiversity aspires the protection of the long and multifarious evolutionary heritage that is threatened today by the rapid human demographic development and unsustainable handling of the biological resources. If biodiversity preservation is often associated with ecology research, conservation genetics aims maintaining the today threatened genetic variation. Contrary to the widespread opinion, not only wildlife is concerned by genetic depletion. Indeed, domestication is inclined to increase the livestock headcount and the range of these species, as breeding organizations tend to homogenize the genetic pool in order to spread and maintain traits of economical interest in the global population. However, the preservation of wildlife and domestic diversity for the future will require sustaining plasticity and potential of adaptation to face global climate change and disease emergence. Success of conservation genetics’ projects relies on the enhancement of knowledge about the current genetic diversity and its distribution and even more on the investigation of the evolutionary history that has shaped this variation. This thesis aimed to illustrate the two different aspects of conservation genetics ; the evolutionary history and population genetic principles were investigated in two wild species, namely the cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) and the wild camel (Camelus ferus) as well as in the two domestic forms, dromedary (Camelus dromedarius) and Bactrian camel (Camelus bactrianus). The results of these conservation genetics projects have already facilitated the elaboration of specific management plans by renowned international organizations.

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Page publiée le 14 janvier 2015, mise à jour le 14 mars 2019