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Michigan State University (2000)

A climate-dependent comparative productivity study of communal and commercial livestock farming systems in Namaqualand South Africa

Solomon, Ayele

Titre : A climate-dependent comparative productivity study of communal and commercial livestock farming systems in Namaqualand South Africa

Auteur : Solomon, Ayele

Université de soutenance : Michigan State University

Grade : Master of Science (MS) 2000

Résumé
A dual economy exists between commercial and communal livestock farming in the semi-desert succulent karoo agroecological zone (AEZ) of South Africa and Namibia. Individually owned commercial farms are interspersed with pockets of communally held reserves comprised of the former ‘Coloured Rural Areas’ (CRAs). Generally, communal areas stock sheep and goats at double the density of commercial farms, and thus have lower levels of vegetative cover on inherently more marginal land (fewer natural drainage areas, and more rocky or mountainous rangeland) compared to commercial farms. This study explores the relationship between Stocking Density (SD) and productivity to determine how close to an economic carrying capacity the two Livestock Farming Systems (LFS) are under Good, Average, and Poor (GAP) veld condition years as conceptualized by the farmer. To compare the relative efficiency and profitability of the two forms of livestock farming, total net returns, and net returns on a per animal and per hectare basis are calculated. The findings are related to the Quality of Life (QOL) found on these two LFS. Policy recommendations (on livestock management and land reform) aimed at improving welfare on communal farms are discussed. Finally, the study creates a typology of communal and commercial livestock farmers based on the survey responses of seven communal farmers and one neighboring commercial farmer.

Mots Clés : Agricultural economics ; Range management ; Social structure ; Livestock ; Farming ; Comparative studies

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Page publiée le 28 mars 2015, mise à jour le 3 avril 2019