Informations et ressources scientifiques
sur le développement des zones arides et semi-arides

Accueil du site → Master → Pays Bas → 2013 → Local people perceived benefits and costs of trans-frontier conservation areas : the case of Likuyusekamaganga village in Selous-Niassa trans-frontier conservation area

Wageningen University (2013)

Local people perceived benefits and costs of trans-frontier conservation areas : the case of Likuyusekamaganga village in Selous-Niassa trans-frontier conservation area

Sengelela, M.

Titre  : Local people perceived benefits and costs of trans-frontier conservation areas : the case of Likuyusekamaganga village in Selous-Niassa trans-frontier conservation area

Auteur  : Sengelela, M. 

Université de soutenance : Wageningen University

Grade : Master of Science (MS) 2013

Résumé partiel
Trans-frontier Conservation Areas are relatively large areas, straddling frontiers between two or more countries and cover large-scale natural systems encompassing one or more protected areas. Trans-frontier Conservation Areas formations are specifically meant to serve ecological, socioeconomical and governance objectives. This study choose and addresses socio-economical objective of Trans-frontier Conservation Areas by examining local people perceived benefits and costs as a result of their living on the edges of the wildlife corridor that forms the Selous-Niassa Trans-frontier Conservation Area. The Selous-Niassa Trans-frontier Conservation Area lies along the borders of Tanzania and Mozambique in Eastern Southern Africa. This study embraces the political ecology framework with reference to three chosen aspects to include access and use of resources, participation, and decision-making and distribution of conservation benefits and costs to establish the perceived benefits and costs of local people in Likuyusekamaganga village. The study executed semi-structured interviews, focus group discussions, observations and secondary data review to establish local people perceived benefits and costs as a result of their living on the edges of the wildlife corridor that forms the Trans Frontier Conservation Area. The study establishes that, access and resource use issues in the wildlife corridor are determined by the international non-governmental conservation organisations in collaboration with the State, the situation that has led to conservation disputes between local people on one side and international non-governmental conservation organisations aligned with the State on the other side. The study established that issues related to access and use of resources in the wildlife corridor accompanied with lack of full participation of local people in decision making regarding resource use and denial of access to the land that is now part of the wildlife corridor has led to conservation disputes where on one side local people see the corridor as a fertile land where agriculture practice would yield more substantial benefits as opposed to the State and international non-governmental conservation organisations that aim at conserving the corridor. Conservation disputes between conservation and uranium mining were also established. The study elaborates on how campaigns against uranium mining by international non-governmental conservation organisations and human rights organisations at the national level went against the State unsuccessfully

Mots clés : conservation areas / wildlife conservation / transboundaries / local population / benefit sharing / cost benefit analysis / mozambique / tanzania

Présentation

Version intégrale (2 Mb)

Page publiée le 16 mars 2015, mise à jour le 18 octobre 2018