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Wageningen University (2012)

When a human-elephant conflict causes frames to collide : the case of Moribane Forest Reserve, Mozambique

Buddiger, M.

Titre : When a human-elephant conflict causes frames to collide : the case of Moribane Forest Reserve, Mozambique

Auteur : Buddiger, M. 

Université de soutenance : Wageningen University

Grade : Master of Science (MS) 2012

Résumé partiel
In the Moribane Forest Reserve in Mozambique, a human-elephant conflict has developed itself. According to the African Elephant Specialist Group (AfSG) (Parker et al.), a broad definition of human-elephant conflict is “any human-elephant interaction which results in negative effects on human social, economic or cultural life, on elephant conservation or on the environment” (2007:11). In this case, it is the Mpunga community, inhabiting part of the Moribane Forest Reserve, who are directly experiencing such a conflict. This subsistence farming community sees their livelihoods jeopardized by the elephants trampling their fields and destroying their crops and homesteads. In 2008, MICAIA Foundation (a Mozambican NGO), came into the area and has set up several development initiatives. MICAIA has expressed interest in research concerning the way the conflict is perceived within the community. As the community is not the only stakeholder in this human-elephant conflict, it was chosen to identify all prominent stakeholders and gain insight into their perspectives on the conflict to gain a better understanding of the conflict situation. In order to perform this research, a theoretical framework has been designed. In this framework, it was attempted to use the notion of storytelling as an overarching concept, but it appeared that framing was more appropriate. In conflict research, the concept of framing is often used. According to Dewulf et al. (2004:3), this has to do with the fact that “conflicts arise among other things from differences in disputants’ frames about what is the issue, what is important and what should be done”. In this research, there are two specific frame types that are extracted from the stories : issue and relational frames. “Framing plays an important role in the creation, evolution and perpetuation of environmental conflicts. Frames are used to define issues, shape what action should be taken by whom, protect oneself, justify a stance we are taking on an issue and to mobilize people to take or refrain from action on the issues” (Gray, 2003:15). In other words, people frame problem, cause and solution when speaking of issue frames and identity, characterization frames when looking at relational frames. In addition to framing, the notion of knowledge underlying these frames is of interest. The following research questions were defined : How do the most prominent stakeholders in the Moribane Forest Reserve in Mozambique frame the current human-elephant conflict in this reserve ? 1. Who is involved with the elephants in the Moribane Forest Reserve and how do they influence the conflict situation between men and elephants ? Who are the most prominent stakeholders in the Moribane Forest Reserve ? What are the interests of the most prominent stakeholders in the Moribane Forest Reserve ? How do the most prominent stakeholders act upon these interests ? 2. What frames are presented in the stories of the most prominent stakeholders in the Moribane Forest Reserve about the human-elephant conflict ? What issue frames do the most prominent stakeholders employ ? What relational frames do the most prominent stakeholders employ ? What knowledge is mobilized by the most prominent stakeholders to construct these frames ? Why do the most prominent stakeholders mobilize these frames ?

Mots clés : forests / nature reserves / mozambique / wild animals / human-animal relationships / man / communities / perception / conflict

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Page publiée le 8 février 2015, mise à jour le 12 octobre 2018