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University of Denver (2014)

Hohokam Population Dynamics : Settlement Organization and Migration at the Sabino Canyon Ruin Site, Arizona

Shereff, Daniel

Titre : Hohokam Population Dynamics : Settlement Organization and Migration at the Sabino Canyon Ruin Site, Arizona

Auteur : Shereff, Daniel

Université de soutenance : University of Denver

Grade : Master of Arts 2014

Résumé
The Hohokam people occupied the southern Arizona desert for more than one thousand years from approximately 450 A.D. to 1450 A.D. Beginning approximately 1100 A.D., the Hohokam underwent a dramatic cultural change. This change was reflected in many aspects of the Hohokam way of life including architecture, trade, subsistence, and ceramic production. Contemporaneous with these changes, there was an influx of people from the north who migrated into the Tucson Basin. The archaeological record of several Classic Period sites in the Tucson Basin demonstrates the presence of locally produced non-native ceramic styles. The Sabino Canyon Ruin site, located on the eastern portion of the Tucson Basin, contains archaeological evidence of these changes. The results of this research demonstrate at the Sabino Canyon Ruin site, immigrant populations were living spatially separate from the native Hohokam. In addition, the data collected in this research suggests that the Hohokam at the Sabino Canyon Ruin site subsisted through means which are atypical in the Tucson Basin, and were organized economically and socially different from other Hohokam populations living along the major river floodplains.

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