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Accueil du site → Doctorat → États-Unis → 2006 → A multi-level study of vulnerability of Mongolian pastoralists to natural hazards and its consequences on individual and household well-being

UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO AT DENVER (2006)

A multi-level study of vulnerability of Mongolian pastoralists to natural hazards and its consequences on individual and household well-being

Chuluundorj, Oyuntsesteg

Titre  : A multi-level study of vulnerability of Mongolian pastoralists to natural hazards and its consequences on individual and household well-being

Auteur : Chuluundorj, Oyuntsesteg

Grade : Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) 2006

Université de soutenance : UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO AT DENVER

Résumé
The transition to the free-market economy following the break-up of a socialist block in early 1990s totally transformed the pastoralist husbandry in Mongolia from state-supported collective farms to independent, subsistence-based herding households. The old socialist system provided a buffer against frequent cases of drought and winter storms. Plus, many negative social and economic consequences, including but not limited to livestock theft, market failure, increasing poverty and inequality, conflict over pasture and water sources has significantly reduced the coping capabilities of herders to resist to natural stress. This study employs a multi-level research design to explore the adaptive and coping strategies employed by rural herders in Mongolia to natural hazard events and the effectiveness of these strategies on their well-being measured in terms of economic and health status. The results of the study indicate that climate stress is not a strong predictor of lower socioeconomic well-being and poorer health outcomes. The role of factors such as gender, age, education and household size that make individuals and households more vulnerable to suffering from natural hazards and their consequences and of adaptive strategies to buffer the effects of natural disasters such as social capital and better herd management skills are crucial in the final outcomes.

Mots clés : HEALTH SCIENCES, PUBLIC HEALTH ; GEOGRAPHY

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Page publiée le 4 mars 2007, mise à jour le 16 novembre 2018