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Accueil du site → Doctorat → États-Unis → 1995 → Urban water in the arid west : Municipal water and sewer utilities in Phoenix, Arizona

Arizona State University (1995)

Urban water in the arid west : Municipal water and sewer utilities in Phoenix, Arizona

Kupel, Douglas Edward

Titre : Urban water in the arid west : Municipal water and sewer utilities in Phoenix, Arizona

Auteur : Kupel, Douglas Edward

Université de soutenance : Arizona State University

Grade : Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) 1995

Résumé
The history of municipal water and sewer utilities in the City of Phoenix, Arizona, examined here covers the period from the initial development of the Salt River Valley until the end of World War Two. The work builds on the contributions of those studying the infrastructure of urban communities, and describes the provision of municipal water and sewer services as a legitimate need that must be met by public officials. The growth of the Phoenix water and sewer systems was a response to public wants and desires. The development of Phoenix water and sewer utilities through the end of World War Two passed through four steps or stages of growth. The delivery of water and the collection of sewage began as a private enterprise in the nineteenth century. At the turn of the century, reformers within and without of city government campaigned for municipal ownership of these utilities. The successful battle to control water and sewer utilities led to a third stage, one of transitional improvements as municipal government improved and perfected its utility service. The final stage of development before World War Two was an era of new initiatives as municipal leaders took on the large improvement projects that private interests lacked the financial capability to complete. By the end of World War Two, Phoenix officials faced a new era as the cycle of growth and development accelerated by the war effort rendered the new initiatives obsolete. The Phoenix experience documents an essentially conservative approach to the provision of municipal water services. Agency officials believed that their task encompassed meeting present and anticipated demand. Although municipal leaders recognized that adequate water and sewer systems were necessary for continued growth and expansion, the development of the urban infrastructure in Phoenix came as a reaction to development rather than being designed as fuel for unplanned progress. Water for Phoenix proved to be an essential element of the growth of this western urban center, but it was just one part of a complex set of components that made up the municipal infrastructure of the community.

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