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Accueil du site → Doctorat → États-Unis → 1995 → Importance of shea nuts for women’s activities and young child nutrition in Burkina Faso : The case of the Lobi

University of Wisconsin - Madison (1995)

Importance of shea nuts for women’s activities and young child nutrition in Burkina Faso : The case of the Lobi

Crelerot, Francoise Marie

Titre : Importance of shea nuts for women’s activities and young child nutrition in Burkina Faso : The case of the Lobi

Auteur : Crelerot, Francoise Marie

Université de soutenance : University of Wisconsin - Madison

Grade : Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) 1995

Résumé
Shea nuts are an important part of the traditional diet in Burkina Faso and shea-nut products are a source of income for women. Additionally, shea nuts were, for many years, an important cash crop in both local and international markets. The research presented here is the first panel and qualitative study examining associations between shea-nut activities and preschool children’s welfare in rural Burkina Faso. The implications of this activity were studied through factors such as women’s time allocation and resource control in the household, child-care and child feeding patterns, and women’s food and nutrition knowledge. In addition, dietary intake and nutritional status of preschool children were explored. Shea butter was an important source of fat in young children’s diets. The frequency of shea-butter consumption increased in children’s diets when shea butter became more available. However, 24-hour frequency of shea-butter consumption and child nutritional status were not statistically different between children whose mothers used the butter primarily as a product to sell compared to those whose mothers used it primarily as a product for family consumption. Surprisingly, though, the average shea-butter consumption of children in households where butter was mainly marketed was consistently higher than that of children in other households, but the difference was not statistically significant. The use by women of shea butter primarily for market purposes or family consumption was not related to variety of foods in children’s diets or women’s monthly purchases and monthly child-related expenses. In a year of better shea-nut harvest and good market value of shea-nut products, shea nuts may have played a more significant economic role in women’s purchasing power. The number of hours spent on shea-nut activities was not significantly related to children’s morbidity or nutritional status. Preschool children in the study villages were underweight and stunted by international standards, and women’s economic status was positively and significantly associated with children’s nutritional status and with dietary factors. Women’s economic status appeared to be a better predictor of children’s nutritional status than was the degree of commercialization of shea butter by the mothers

Mots clés : Personal relationships, Sociology, Health and environmental sciences, Families & family life, Nutrition, Social sciences Womens studies, Public health

Présentation (PROQUEST)

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