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Accueil du site → Doctorat → États-Unis → 2008 → Ground and satellite-based remote sensing of mineral dust using AERI spectra and MODIS thermal infrared window brightness temperatures

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, LOS ANGELES (2008)

Ground and satellite-based remote sensing of mineral dust using AERI spectra and MODIS thermal infrared window brightness temperatures

Hansell, Richard Allen, Jr

Titre : Ground and satellite-based remote sensing of mineral dust using AERI spectra and MODIS thermal infrared window brightness temperatures

Auteur : Hansell, Richard Allen, Jr

Université de soutenance : UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, LOS ANGELES

Grade : Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) 2008

Résumé
The radiative effects of dust aerosol on our climate system have yet to be fully understood and remain a topic of contemporary research. To investigate these effects, detection/retrieval methods for dust events over major dust outbreak and transport areas have been developed using satellite and ground-based approaches. To this end, both the shortwave and longwave surface radiative forcing of dust aerosol were investigated.
The ground-based remote sensing approach uses the Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer brightness temperature spectra to detect mineral dust events and to retrieve their properties. Taking advantage of the high spectral resolution of the AERI instrument, absorptive differences in prescribed thermal IR window sub-band channels were exploited to differentiate dust from cirrus clouds. AERI data collected during the UAE2 at Al-Ain UAE was employed for dust retrieval. Assuming a specified dust composition model a priori and using the light scattering programs of T-matrix and the finite difference time domain methods for oblate spheroids and hexagonal plates, respectively, dust optical depths have been retrieved and compared to those inferred from a collocated and coincident AERONET sun-photometer dataset. The retrieved optical depths were then used to determine the dust longwave surface forcing during the UAE2. Likewise, dust shortwave surface forcing is investigated employing a differential technique from previous field studies.
The satellite-based approach uses MODIS thermal infrared brightness temperature window data for the simultaneous detection/separation of mineral dust and cirrus clouds. Based on the spectral variability of dust emissivity at the 3.75, 8.6, 11 and 12 μm wavelengths, the D*-parameter, BTD-slope and BTD3-11 tests are combined to identify dust and cirrus. MODIS data for the three dust-laden scenes have been analyzed to demonstrate the effectiveness of this detection/separation method. Detected daytime dust and cloud coverage for the Persian Gulf case compare reasonably well to those from the "Deep Blue" algorithm developed at NASA-GSFC. The nighttime dust/cloud detection for the cases surrounding Cape Verde and Niger, West Africa has been validated by comparing to coincident and collocated ground-based micro-pulse lidar measurements.

Mots clés : Atmospheric sciences ; Remote sensing

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Page publiée le 19 février 2015, mise à jour le 5 décembre 2018