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Accueil du site → Doctorat → États-Unis → 1980 → RESIDENTIAL FLOOD IRRIGATION AND MICROCLIMATE IN PHOENIX, ARIZONA

Arizona State University (1980)

RESIDENTIAL FLOOD IRRIGATION AND MICROCLIMATE IN PHOENIX, ARIZONA

BARNETT, ALBERT PRINNON

Titre : RESIDENTIAL FLOOD IRRIGATION AND MICROCLIMATE IN PHOENIX, ARIZONA

Auteur : BARNETT, ALBERT PRINNON

Université de soutenance : Arizona State University

Grade : Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) 1980

Résumé
The impact of man’s activities on the landscape and the atmosphere has been the primary focus of considerable environmental research. Alteration of the natural environment due to cultural activities are very pronounced in arid regions. One of the most obvious changes in arid regions is produced by the practice of flood irrigating residential areas during the summer months. The introduction of water to these virtually dry areas has far reaching implications in altering the natural environment. Hence, the microclimatic impact of flood irrigation in residential communities in the Phoenix, Arizona metropolitan area is the focus of this research. To assess irrigation impacts on microclimate, data collection and analysis were accomplished at two scales : (1) the establishment of a microclimatic monitoring station at a representative flood irrigated residential site, and (2) the mesoclimatic study of residential flood irrigation practiced in the Salt River Project irrigation district. A microclimatic monitoring station was maintained at a residential site in south-central Phoenix during the period June-August, 1977. Principal measurements included the energy fluxes necessary to complete the surface energy balance equation (net radiation, latent heat, sensible heat, and ground heat fluxes). A comparative analysis of saturated lawn conditions and subsequent drying periods revealed : (1) the rate of evaporation closely approximated to potential rate throughout the first week following irrigation, and (2) air temperature gradients may be used to identify periods when less than potential rates are experienced. The spatial impact of flood irrigation on the microclimate was monitored for several communities using a mobile transecting unit. The temperature gradient monitored using this technique failed to identify those lawns from which irrigation water was not evaporating at the potential rate.

Mots clés : Geography, Earth sciences

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Présentation : ProQuest

Page publiée le 6 avril 2015, mise à jour le 5 novembre 2018