Informations et ressources scientifiques
sur le développement des zones arides et semi-arides

Accueil du site → Doctorat → États-Unis → 1994 → Economic analysis of soil productivity in bush/fallow farming systems, North Kordofan, Sudan

Washington State University (1994)

Economic analysis of soil productivity in bush/fallow farming systems, North Kordofan, Sudan

Elhanan, Mohamed Mahmoud

Titre : Economic analysis of soil productivity in bush/fallow farming systems, North Kordofan, Sudan

Auteur : Elhanan, Mohamed Mahmoud

Université de soutenance : Washington State University

Grade : Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) 1994

Résumé
The traditional crop-bush/fallow farming system in North Kordofan is under increasing pressure. Land is being kept in cultivation for longer periods and brought back into cultivation after shorter periods in fallow. A major consequence of more soil depletion intensive cultivation is resulting in declining soil fertility and lower crop yields. Thus, the current farming practices in North Kordofan cannot sustain soil productivity. Like many other semi-arid nations the dilemma is how to feed the residents of these food shortage areas without damaging the natural resource base. The overall objective of this study was to analyze the long-run productivity and profitability of alternative crop-bush/fallow rotations in North Kordofan. A simulation model and the capital budgeting approach were used to evaluate alternatives taking into account the short- and long-run impact of soil depletion on agricultural productivity. For the analysis, 14 rotations were selected to represent current and alternative practices. Four rotations were selected to represent current practice, six rotations were designed with sufficient fallow to be sustainable, and five rotations represent slightly less fallow than would be required for sustaining yield over time. Outputs of millet, fodder, fuelwood, and gumarabic are simulated over 50 years for each rotation. Undiscounted net return and net present value are computed. The study concludes that the rotations commonly practiced by most farmers in North Kordofan are depleting practices. Sustainable rotations with fewer years in crop and fallow at least two times cropping period would result in higher, nondeclining outputs and higher net return than rotations currently practiced. The rate at which future returns are discounted has a great effect on the profitability of sustainable soil management systems. At the 50 percent discount rate that farmers report, the net present value of sustainable rotations is no higher than that of depleting rotations.

Accès au document : Proquest Dissertations & Theses

Page publiée le 3 mars 2015, mise à jour le 23 février 2019