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Accueil du site → Doctorat → États-Unis → 1995 → A conceptual hydrogeologic model for northeast Sinai, Egypt, with application to ground-water exploration using satellite data

Boston University (1995)

A conceptual hydrogeologic model for northeast Sinai, Egypt, with application to ground-water exploration using satellite data

Morency, Robert Emile, Jr

Titre : A conceptual hydrogeologic model for northeast Sinai, Egypt, with application to ground-water exploration using satellite data

Auteur : Morency, Robert Emile, Jr

Université de soutenance : Boston University

Grade : Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) 1995

Résumé
The Sinai Peninsula of Egypt is a sparsely populated 61,000 km$\sp2$ region separated from the rest of the nation by the Suez Canal, and from the Arabian Peninsula by the Gulf of Aqaba. The landscape is rugged, and the climate is extremely arid, except in the northeast where most of the population is settled. Development plans require that water supplies be assessed, and that reliable, high-quality sources be identified. The purpose of this dissertation is to assess the current knowledge of the hydrogeology of Sinai, to develop a model describing the processes by which aquifers are recharged, and to assess the capabilities of remotely sensed data in ground-water exploration. Large amounts of ground water are stored in deep sandstone and carbonate aquifers in central and northern Sinai, as well as in fracture-zone aquifers throughout the peninsula. Fracture-zone aquifers are important in regions where near-surface rocks are of low porosity, such as the igneous and metamorphic terrain of southern Sinai and carbonate plateaus in the central region. A conceptual infiltration and storage model is presented to account for data which indicate that, despite the arid climate, fractured-rock aquifers contain recently recharged water. According to the model, wadi-fill deposits absorb flood runoff, and allow a recharge flux to seep into fracture zones where they intersect or coincide with wadis. The ability of remotely sensed data to identify landscape features pertinent to the model is assessed by using a known occurrence of a fractured aquifer in northeastern Sinai. The results indicate that features such as lineaments and drainage channels can be mapped on Landsat images in sufficient detail to equal or exceed other sources, including topographic maps and standard field mapping. Multispectral data is capable of identifying landscape features relevant to ground water, such as flood residue, drainage channels, and fractured basalt dikes. The results of the hydrogeologic assessment suggest that, with the addition of a program of field chemistry and well location and elevation surveying, it should be possible to develop reliable regional-scale numerical models, which may be used in developing economic water-use models.

Mots clés : Groundwater, Sinai Peninsula, Applied sciences, Remote sensing, Hydrology, Geology aquifer recharge, Earth sciences

Accès au document : Proquest Dissertations & Theses

Page publiée le 26 février 2015, mise à jour le 1er janvier 2017