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Accueil du site → Doctorat → Australie → 1998 → Nutrient film technique treatment of municipal wastewater generating commercially valuable plants and environmentally sound effluent for local communities

University of New South Wales (1998)

Nutrient film technique treatment of municipal wastewater generating commercially valuable plants and environmentally sound effluent for local communities

Rababah, Abdellah Ali Moh’D

Titre : Nutrient film technique treatment of municipal wastewater generating commercially valuable plants and environmentally sound effluent for local communities

Auteur : Rababah, Abdellah Ali Moh’D

Université de soutenance : University of New South Wales

Grade : Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) 1998

Résumé
The objectives of this thesis were to design an inexpensive and simple system that can treat primary municipal wastewater to discharge standards, produce commercially valuable plants for small communities in arid and semi-arid areas and provide an increased supply of water for irrigation free from viruses and other pathogens that might cause public health problems, with low operational costs. A commercial hydroponic system was adapted for studying the potential recycling of nutrients from primary treated municipal sewage effluent. The system consists of five gullies, 3 meters long by 100 mm wide. Primary treated effluent was used to irrigate lettuce in one series (wastewater plot), and a commercial nutrient solution was used to irrigate the same type of lettuce in another series as a control (control plot). Lettuce plants grew well in the system and removed over 77% of the phosphorus, 80% of the nitrogen, 87% of BOD and 99% of the suspended solids. Lettuces however, were found to take up spores of the bacterium, Clostridium perfringens and model viruses (fluorescent 0.1 μm microspheres). Microbial data were used in a β-Poisson dose respond model (Haas, 1983) for health risk assessment. Dose respond model predictions indicated that the probability for an individual to be infected due to the consumption of the lettuce plants grown in the NFT channels with primary treated municipal effluent was more than 50% for viruses. Moreover, plants accumulated heavy metals in leaf tissues at concentrations (As = 6.5, Cd = 3.8, Pb = 20 mg kg -1 ) higher than the maximum levels recommended by Australia and New Zealand Food Authority (1995). Hence, it is recommended to grow ornamental or non-edible crops, such as essential oils or pyrethrum. This thesis focused on modelling phosphorus removal with the hydroponic NFT experimental pilot plant to design a full-scale production treatment hydroponic farm (PTHF) for small communities. It was concluded that the phosphorus removal model developed could be used to design an inexpensive and simple full-scale PTHF for small communities (<400 people). The farm treats the wastewater to provide an alternative resource of nonpotable water and commercially valuable plants. Non-edible plants are recommended at this stage due to possible microbial and heavy metal contamination.

Mots clés : Bioremediation, Sanitation, Nutrient film technique, Applied sciences, Environmental science, Clostridium perfringens, Health and environmental sciences, Environmental engineering, Wastewater

Accès au document : Proquest Dissertations & Theses

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