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Accueil du site → Doctorat → États-Unis → 1988 → Effect of protein supplementation on performance, water intake, and travel of beef cattle grazing semidesert rangeland in Southcentral New Mexico

New Mexico State University (1988)

Effect of protein supplementation on performance, water intake, and travel of beef cattle grazing semidesert rangeland in Southcentral New Mexico

Rouda, Robert Rabih

Titre : Effect of protein supplementation on performance, water intake, and travel of beef cattle grazing semidesert rangeland in Southcentral New Mexico

Auteur : Rouda, Robert Rabih

Université de soutenance : New Mexico State University

Grade : Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) 1988

Résumé
Trials were conducted in 1986 to study the effect of supplementing cows with 41% crude protein (CP) cottonseed pellets on their subsequent liveweight change, calf liveweight change, fecal botanical composition, daily water consumption and travel in cows grazing semidesert rangeland between 16 April and 18 August. Effects of physiological status (lactating vs. non-lactating) were also considered. Precipitation during the study was 68% above average. Cows were fed either no supplement (Control), 1.4 kg/head/day fed every 2.6-4.5 days (High), or 0.7 kg/head/day fed every 4.4-8.1 days (Low). Use of an electronic identification system facilitated all animals being maintained within the same pasture. Supplemented cows gains were similar (P $>$ 0.05) to unsupplemented cows during the feeding period. Calf growth was not affected (P $>$ 0.05) by level of dam supplementation, but dams administered the Low level weaned heavier (P $<$ 0.05) calves than Control dams. Neither level of supplementation nor physiological status affected fecal botanical composition (P $>$ 0.05). No differences (P $>$ 0.05) in calving rate in 1987 were found as a result of supplementation in 1986. Cows consumed an average of 57 liters of water daily. Cows receiving the High level of supplementation consumed similar amounts (P $>$ 0.05) of water as those receiving the Low level but less (P $<$ 0.05) than Control cows. Lactating cows consumed more water (P $<$ 0.05) than non-lactating cows. Neither level of supplementation nor physiological status affected (P $>$ 0.05) daily watering frequency. At ambient air temperatures between 8 and 38 C, low correlation coefficients were calculated between water consumption and daily mean (P = 0.76), daily maximum temperatures (P = 0.47), and relative humidities (P $<$ 0.01) ranging between 15 and 86%. Cows traveled an average of 8.0 km/day. Neither supplementation (P = 0.98) nor lactational status (P = 0.53) affected daily travel. Over the 81-day study, travel decreased 0.06 km/day (P $<$ 0.01). Daily travel was positively correlated (P $<$ 0.01) to rainfall and hours of daylight. Travel was negatively correlated (P $<$ 0.01) to daily mean, daily minimum, and mean daily maximum ambient air temperatures. Travel was not affected (P = 0.12) by relative humidities ranging between 22 and 95%.

Mots clés : cattle grazing,behavior, cattle,behavior, cattle,protein supplementation, cattle,water intake, grazing management,

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