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Accueil du site → Doctorat → États-Unis → 1986 → PATTERNS OF ANASAZI SUBSISTENCE : FAUNAL EXPLOITATION, SUBSISTENCE DIVERSIFICATION, AND SITE FUNCTION IN NORTHEASTERN ARIZONA

University of Washington (1986)

PATTERNS OF ANASAZI SUBSISTENCE : FAUNAL EXPLOITATION, SUBSISTENCE DIVERSIFICATION, AND SITE FUNCTION IN NORTHEASTERN ARIZONA

LEONARD, ROBERT DE WAYNE

Titre : PATTERNS OF ANASAZI SUBSISTENCE : FAUNAL EXPLOITATION, SUBSISTENCE DIVERSIFICATION, AND SITE FUNCTION IN NORTHEASTERN ARIZONA

Auteur : LEONARD, ROBERT DE WAYNE

Université de soutenance : University of Washington

Grade : Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) 1986

Résumé
The Anasazi of the American Southwest displayed successful adaptations to semiarid and arid environments for over 1,500 years when unknown conditions resulted in the abandonment of much of the area by A.D. 1400. In this study, I generate a number of conclusions, and evaluate the conclusions of a number of other researchers, relating to changes in Anasazi subsistence practices through time within the context of the continued development of an agricultural system. Using archaeofaunal materials recovered from Black Mesa, Arizona, and botanical materials recovered from much of the northern Southwest, I provide information pertinent to the study of agricultural development in general, as well as elucidating the prehistoric subsistence practices of the inhabitants of Black Mesa. I address, in particular, four topics which relate to the specific context of Black Mesa, and the broader issue of agricultural development : (1) were changes in the material culture of these peoples accompanied by changes in their use of animal resources ? (2) did within-time period differences in faunal assemblage content meet or exceed that which could be seen across periods ? (3) are arguments that have been made for late Puebloan subsistence diversification valid ? (4) do faunal inventories correspond with site architectural morphology in such a manner as to suggest differences in site function ? As a result of addressing these and related topics, this work adds to our rapidly increasing knowledge regarding the adaptations of the prehistoric Anasazi.

Annonce : Research Gate

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