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Accueil du site → Doctorat → Pays-Bas → 2007 → Who gains, who loses ? : the impact of market liberalisation on rural households in Nortwestern Kenya

Wageningen Universiteit (2006)

Who gains, who loses ? : the impact of market liberalisation on rural households in Nortwestern Kenya

Mose, L.O.

Titre : Who gains, who loses ? : the impact of market liberalisation on rural households in Nortwestern Kenya

Auteur : Mose, L.O.

Université de soutenance : Wageningen Universiteit

Grade : PhD thesis 2007

Résumé partiel
Most countries in Sub-Saharan Africa, includingKenya, liberalised their agricultural commodity markets in the 1980s and 1990s as a strategy to increase marketing efficiency. In this thesis, we provide an account of the impacts of market liberalisation on households inNorthwestern Kenya, a maize surplus producing region. We apply several analytical frameworks including descriptive statistics, structure, conduct and performance modeling, cointegration and error correction modeling approaches, double differencing and multinomial probit regression to both primary and secondary data. A descriptive review of the market liberalisation process indicates that commodity markets are liberalised. This is particularly evidenced by the increased number of traders across the four commodity markets (fertiliser, seed, maize and milk) examined. However, the markets are only partially liberalised since there is still some government active participation in some markets like maize and milk. An analysis of the structure, conduct and performance of the four commodity markets shows that the markets are competitive. This is evidenced by low trader concentration levels and marketing margins. Furthermore, there is no evidence of collusion among traders in terms of pricing or limiting market supply despite financial and structural constraints that limit firm expansion. The ensuing increased private trader participation in commodity markets partly explains the observed marketing integration among maize wholesale markets, and a positive and strong aggregate supply response both in the short- and long-run.

Mots clés : economic development / markets / agricultural households / trade / agricultural production / kenya / africa / maize / liberalization

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Page publiée le 23 mars 2007, mise à jour le 3 juin 2022