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UKAID Department for International Development (R4D) 2005

Crop-livestock integration : new dynamics of intensification in contrasting agroecological zones - a follow up study in southern Africa

Crop Livestock

UKAID Department for International Development (R4D)

Titre : Crop-livestock integration : new dynamics of intensification in contrasting agroecological zones - a follow up study in southern Africa

Pays : Zimbabwe

Projet de recherche pour le Développement : R8420

DFID Programme : Livestock Production

Organismes de mise en œuvre
Lead Institutes : Institute of Development Studies, University of Sussex (IDS)
Managing Institutes : Natural Resources International Limited (NRIL)
Collaborating Institutes : Inter African Bureau for Animal Resources (IBAR)

Durée : 01-04-2005 / 28-02-2006

Présentation
To increase the effectiveness of policies aimed at improving the performance of livestock in the semi-arid crop-livestock production systems. One of the key findings of the earlier work was that contexts matter, and that, through their impacts on institutions and policies, contexts affect the pathways of livelihood change that emerge in any setting, and so the form of crop-livestock interaction and the types of technology demand. Contexts for livestock production and management are fast-changing in Africa. Market liberalisation, for example, is opening new opportunities for trade, but this is contingent on satisfying ever more stringent food safety and public health standards for marketing and export. Such factors are increasingly defining the way livestock, and particularly large stock, are integrated into local, national and international economies. Today, livestock policy must encompass an integrative view of animal production, range management, veterinary support and trade and markets. Yet, as the original CLI project demonstrated, views on each of these have tended to be rooted in colonial-era models, often designed with large-scale commercial beef production in mind. As the earlier work showed, they have focussed on technical interventions not on institutional and policy issues, with the result that efforts have not necessarily been directed towards achieving pro-poor development goals. Across each of the three country cases examined in the earlier phase, it is the Zimbabwe case that has undergone the most dramatic change in context since 2000. Changes are on two fronts. This has potential implications for neighbouring countries in the region. The first is the on-going shift on the part of remaining commercial cattle producers into game ranching (including FMD-carrying buffalo) and the related moves into establishing wildlife conservancies and transboundary conservation areas, with resulting removal or re-siting of veterinary fencing. The second is the large-scale occupation and subsequent ’fast-track resettlement’ of commercial ranches (both cattle and game) and the associated breakdown in the country’s veterinary regime and increased informal livestock sales and cattle rustling (especially to Mozambique). Over the past few years, there has been a dramatic reduction in the commercial breeding herd and a partial reconfiguring of remaining beef exports to new markets. Greater livestock mobility has brought cattle and wildlife into contact and led to regular FMD outbreaks. It has also allowed smallholder livestock owners to move livestock more flexibly to find pasture and markets in drought periods.

Total Cost to DFID : £50,016

Présentation : UKAID

Page publiée le 14 septembre 2015, mise à jour le 2 novembre 2017